Hello friends Please help us.We are going to buy a new house.

Hello friends Please help us.We are going to buy a new house. As the one we have selected is a single storied building, we have decided to construct a new room on first floor. We are going to use it as a reading room. So, I would like to install casement windows at there but my wife’s choice is awing window. Now i am totally confused . Which one will be better and safe..??? And also pls help me to find some window experts in Canada. Heritage homes is a suggestion of my friend. Any other choice?
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On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 9:44:06 AM UTC-5, Robert Davis wrote:

There are pros and cons to both (all) types of windows and it would be hard for us to tell you (and your wife) what you (and your wife) want.
Why do you want casement windows?
Why does your wife want awning windows?
How important is it for your relationship that you to let your wife choose the window style? (Some couples will weigh the pro and cons and come to a mutually agreed upon, non-emotional decision. Others will let emotions play a part (not that there is anything wrong with that) and it will become an on-going issue in the relationship.)
How do you plan to decorate the interior and will that have an impact on the choice of window style?
The location matters, the style of the house matters, the other windows on the house matter, etc.
Pella, as well as just about about any other window company as well as home design sites, will list the pros, cons, features and benefits of each style.
Here is just one example:
http://pressroom.pella.com/fast_facts/83/windows-101-tips-for-selecting-the-right-window-for-your-home
Without more specifics as to your situation and wants, we can't tell you which is "better" for you and your wife.
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On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 9:44:06 AM UTC-5, Robert Davis wrote:

probably best to match the existing window style and manufacturer, to your new windows.
miss matched will cause issues at home resale time
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On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 12:09:39 PM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

The new windows don't have to "match", they just shouldn't "clash".
Putting a casement, slider or awning over a specific window, e.g. the one over the kitchen sink, will not "match" the double hungs on the rest of the house, but it won't "clash" either. BTDT
My grandparent's ranch had double hungs in all bedrooms and bathrooms, but the living room wall - which was mostly glass - had awning windows. Architecturally, they were perfect for the house, even though they didn't match the majority of the windows in the rest of the house.
It's very possible that a different style window on the OP's addition will be just fine as long as they work with the addition and the addition works with the rest of the house. Yes, you need to *consider* the style of the other windows, but you don't necessarily have to *match* them.
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On 12/30/2015 7:44 AM, Robert Davis wrote:

Define "better" and "safe(r)"? Budgetary issues? In Canada, I suspect you're more concerned with thermal efficiency than how well it fares in intense, perpetual heat and sun...
[N.B. there are also "hopper" windows if you don't want the "awning" opening *out*]
We've opted for sliders as our windows tend to go down pretty close to the ground (most are 60 inches tall) and would be a hazzard if they opened "in" or "out" as they create keep away zones inside or outside the house in those areas (so the window can swing into them).

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Robert Davis wrote:

There is no "better", depends upon what you are trying to do.
Both give a large area of opening.
Both stick out from the exterior wall.
Both latch securely.
Both may have problems down the road with the opening crank.
Both require screens on the inside.
One advantage of the awning window is that they can be left open when it rains; that's one reason I put them in our bathrooms. However, IMO, I think casement looks better.
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On Wednesday, December 30, 2015 at 2:24:28 PM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

Not necessarily. There are inward opening windows in both casement and awning styles.
http://beaumart.ca/what-we-do/windows/awning-windows-inward-outward/
http://www.marvin.com/marvin/windows/casement-inswing

Not if they open inward.

Not if they open inward.

And then there's Turn and Tilt style. A hybrid inward opening casement and hopper. JELD-WEN, Pella, and many others offer them.
http://www.jeld-wen.com/catalog/windows/custom/wood/tilt-and-turn
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On 12/30/2015 9:44 AM, Robert Davis wrote:

Better is subjective. Casements are better at catching a breeze, awnings are better at keeping out rain. You may want to consider a greenhouse style window to have flowers in the reading room. http://www.greenhousewindows.com/
Since you both are considering different styles you should discuss why you want that particular style. Go to a good home store and look and play with them to see if they truly fit your perceived needs.
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Maybe you should also consider if you'll ever want to stick your head out of the window.
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