Height of water and electric connections for washer and dryer?

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If we mount our new washer and dryer on pedestals, they will cover the water connections and the power outlet. Practically, we can move them up the wall because all the wiring and piping comes down the wall, but is there any reason why we shouldn't do so? -- Code? Something we haven't thought of?
Perce
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 1:45:44 PM UTC-4, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

I'd leave them where they are. I haven't touched my water connections since installing the washer. Some people turn off the water each time, but not most people. Get the best hoses you can, and forget about it.
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On 03/31/2016 12:54 PM, trader_4 wrote:

+1
Who's to say what the next fad will be?
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On 3/31/2016 10:45 AM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Yup.

There is usually enough of a service loop in the power cord and water supply lines that you can leave them "as is" and access them by pulling the appliances away from the wall.
The problem, IME, has been the "stops" that allow you to isolate the water supply lines (so they don't remain under pressure when not needed). These have to be accessible while the appliances are in place.
If you raise *everything* (stops and connections), the issue you'll have to worry about (later) is typically the DRAIN for the washer -- as it tends not to have as much of a service loop as the supply lines.
What we've done is: - add right-angle adapters to the water connections at the rear of the washer and dryer (so the hoses can naturally "fall" instead of heading straight back and then having to turn downwards on themselves in a short distance) - raised the manual water stops so they can (begrudginly) be accessed with the appliances on their bases - added a set of electrically operated solenoids (so water pressure in the supply lines can be gated off when not in use)
We also replaced the "flex hose" for the dryer exhaust with an adjustable "duct" that consumes less space (front to back) than the ~4" flex hose and is more readily adjusted up/down to mate directly to the dryer's exhaust connection.
[Next on the list is a scissor lift to replace the "bases" and allow us to reclaim the space atop the appliances]
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On 03/31/2016 02:17 PM, Don Y wrote:

I can hardly pull the washer away from the wall. It would be much more difficult for my wife.

That is the major problem I want to fix.

Since the laundry room is in the basement, and the washer outlet is a standpipe just below the ceiling joists, raising the washer will be no problem in that respect.

Good idea. The washer outlet hose already has that.

That appeals to my inner geek, but I'm not sure that I would do it.

The new dryer has not yet been delivered, but I do have one of those adjustable "ducts" -- one with a regular 4" duct fitting at the top, to connect via semi-rigid duct to the rigid ducting between the floor joists above.

Perce
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Myself, I would install it where it's convenient, and then worry about any changes to make. You may see that it's just fine once it's in place.
Besides being at convenient height, you may gain some storage underneath. And (my favorite) put a drip pan underneath.
Rambling on.... In general, it's good practice to have the electrical higher than plumbing in case of leaks. I would also want to have the electrical plug and water faucets where they are within reach without having to move something out from the wall.
It might be worth while to mount a power strip on the wall for the washer where you can get to it, and have a plumber extend the hot & cold pipes above or to the side. Belkin makes a high quality grounded power strip with a circuit breaker for under $15. Don't go the $2.99 Harbor Freight route for this.
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On 3/31/2016 5:02 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Yes, even worse when the washer (which may be a top loader) is full of water. But, you only need to access those connections when servicing the unit -- not in day-to-day use!

Exactly. SWMBO and I were raised to always turn off the water to the washer/dryer after each use. So, access to those stops is important. But, even without this sort of practice, if the hoses (or something internal to the washer/dryer) fail, you want to be able to interrupt the water supply *now* -- not several minutes from now (e.g., by running to the whole-house valve and cutting off ALL water -- for the duration of your repair!)
We're both tall enough that we can reach to the rear of the appliances and turn the valves on/off. Neighbor, OTOH, can barely reach the *top* of the washer standing on the *garage* floor with washer and dryer on base cabinets.
[They have since moved the shutoffs to the *side* of the washer so she can reach without needing to climb up a step ladder and crawl over the top of the appliance. Or, resort to a plea to her friendly neighbor :> ]

In our case, we want the washer and dryer pushed back as far as possible (up against the back wall).

You're not thinking in terms of Accessibility! :>
Put yourself in a wheelchair or stopped over from scoliosis (or other geriatric condition) and think of how you'd reach the valves -- wherever you relocate them!
I monitor for water on the floor (a sign of a probable leak/failure), and "unattended" water running when not expected (e.g., if you are in the bathroom, I can expect water to be running; if you're in the bedroom and I notice water running, there are only a few places where it can happen without raising an alarm).
You can buy hoses that have a valve that *hopefully* won't be calcified from years of nonuse and will stop the flow of water FOR A CATASTROPHIC FAILURE. But, these only work if the flow rate is excessive: if there is no back pressure from the appliance. So, a pinhole rupture in the "armored" line like we encountered would continue unabated. Likewise, any failures inside the appliance (e.g., level sensor failing to signal the washer is full; door sensor failing to indicate door is ajar; door seal failure, etc.)
I also automatically turn the water supply to the washer/dryer off when the cycle is complete (as I only have one set of valves, there, I can't turn off the washer's water supply until I know the dryer is done, as well). So, a wheelchair-bound resident could load and unload the appliances AND be assured the water supply is disconnected even though he/she can't reach the stops.

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On 3/31/2016 8:58 PM, Don Y wrote:

Interesting. First I'd heard of shut offs used between every use of the washer or dryer.
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On 3/31/2016 8:58 PM, Don Y wrote:

Do you use stainless braided no burst hose to supply washer to your clothes dryer? What happens if the clothes dryer has the water turned off, in mid cycle? Do the clothes come out dry, instead?
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 9:01:16 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

If you left the water turned off to the dryer all the time, it would probably dry the clothes better, don't ya think?

Access to the washer supply valves is important only if you think it's important. There are some really strong, metal reinforced hoses out there. They work for me. And you can change them every ten years. Seems a better solution than screwing around, turning off the water each time. Or there are electronic safeties that you can install too. Any of those work for me.

Oh yeah. Mr. Johnny on the spot. Standing right there, watching for it to happen, he turns off the valve. God forbid the extra 30 secs to get to the main shutoff instead. And never mind that it can happen when you're in another part of the house, or not even at home.
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On 3/31/2016 1:45 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Why mount them on pedestals? Are you joining the Church of the Divine Maytag or some thing?
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On 03/31/2016 04:40 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Easier on the back when loading and unloading.
Perce
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On 3/31/2016 4:50 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

+1
Also, easier to clean the "lint trap" in the washer (without water spilling over the floor).
We've decided that the washer should be loaded/unloaded "up high" -- as should the dryer be UNloaded. But, the dryer should be loaded "down low" so you can lift the heavy, wet clothes from the washer and let them "fall" into the dryer.
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On 3/31/2016 9:01 PM, Don Y wrote:

My top loading Whirlpool would be impossible to load, if it were much higher. You must be very tall?
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On 3/31/2016 7:50 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

How tall are you? If my Whirlpool was much higher, I'd need a ladder. As it is, more than hip height. I can't imagine to put it up any higher.
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On 03/31/2016 09:28 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The washer is a front loader. The overpriced pedestals from the manufacturer are 15 1/2" high. I was thinking of building our own that are maybe 18" high to leave space for pairs of "nested" laundry baskets underneath.
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On 4/1/2016 10:59 AM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Ah... front loaders. Makes sense.
And, the space for baskets also is great idea.
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On 4/1/2016 7:59 AM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Imagine what happens when a hose breaks, the washer leaks (bad seal), wet clothes drip, etc. I'm not sure storing anything UNDER a washer is a good choice.
The store-bought pedestals don't appear to be good for much. E.g., our detergent bottles are too tall to fit inside them. And, would require you to bend and lift gallon jugs each time you wanted to do wash.
We prefer to use the space atop the washer dryer (to fold clothes, sort through items going in/out, etc.).
But, have cabinets there so with the W/D "up", we lose that space.
As the W/D really only need to be "up" for loading/unloading, I'm looking into installing scissor lifts under each appliance so they can be raised and lowered, as needed. HF has some lifts that might be easily repurposed.
[This also addresses my "accessibility" concerns as someone aged with scoliosis or powerchair-bound would want the appliances at a different height. It also deals with the inevitable "we need to get the washer dryer *down* so we can service it"]
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On 04/01/2016 01:56 PM, Don Y wrote:

It's *empty* laundry baskets we're thinking of storing there: bring them upstairs to load and unload.

A wheelchair-bound person won't be using this washer and dryer, because they're in the basement.
Perce
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