Heating pipe relocation question for plumbers?

In my basement I have a length of 3/4 copper hot water heat pipe that is dead in the way of a new dryer vent hard tube path. When I traced both ends of the 3/4" pipe it appears that the circuit simply makes about a 4' U from one baseboard radiator to another. Why the installer did this I'm sure he doesn't even know. But somehow I've got to reroute it or better yet go from one radiator to the other in a rather straight line.
The pipes come through the floor and immediate have elbows. I'd like to use 3/4 sharkbite elbows but because the new line needs to run under the joists I was wondering if anyone is aware of any 3/4 braided ss hose that I can connect between one elbow and the other. That would make a direct 4' connection from one under the joists to the other.
I want to NOT have to solder as I have lots of pvc and wood in that area. So, any suggestions as to how I can accomplish this, what ever way, would be greatly apprecated.
Thanks
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On Monday, July 15, 2013 3:34:51 PM UTC-7, BobMCT wrote:

The u turn may be to mitigate the effects of expansion and contraction.
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Check to see if that 4 foot wide "U" goes across a doorway or hallway on the floor plan directly above that "U".
You can use 3/4 inch sharkbite fittings for this, but I've never heard of a flexible supply hose being allowed to stand in for a pipe in a hot water heating system.
Now, if this is a house with only one thermostat, then you almost certainly have gate valves on all but the longest radiator loop. These gate valves are called "balancing valves", and their function is to pinch off the flow through the shortest straightest radiator loops to force more water through the longer and more tortuous radiator loops, thereby promoting uniform heating of the house.
If you put another coupla bends in that radiator loop, it's going to offer more resistance to water flow through it, and so you'll have to rebalance the flow of heating water through all of the radiator loops. This would involve closing the balancing valves just a bit on the shorter straighter loops to force more water through the loop that you added the elbows to.
--
nestork


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On Tue, 16 Jul 2013 07:10:55 +0200, nestork

Never saw flex either. You can use Sharkbite fittings and put in a section of PEX too. I did that in a problem area on my system.
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On Tuesday, July 16, 2013 5:54:26 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I don't see what the problem is with PVC and wood nearby preventing soldering. You cover it up with some wet rags.
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' snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net[_2_ Wrote: > ;3092666']

I agree. I've soldered in some pretty tight spaces too, but when the OP says:
"I want to NOT have to solder as I have lots of pvc and wood in that area."
Then he can see his situation better than we can, and so it's prudent to leave soldering off the table.
--
nestork


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On Tue, 16 Jul 2013 04:39:23 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Depends on your skill level. Experienced people can get very close to flammables with no problem. I think he as more concerned about the looping though.
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Hi Ed,
So if I hear you correctly Pex can be used for hot water heating feed pipes? If so then I can create a loop of Pex but avoid the area that is causing issues now. That being the case, tomorrow will be Pex purchase day.
BTW - the pipe to be moved is the upper of four layers of copper and pvc pipe so for me even cutting the copper out is going to be difficult.
Thanks all
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wrote:

Yes, 3/4" pex will do the job. I have a section of pex replacing a problem copper line I had originally. Sharkbite fillings are simple to use and hold on both the copper and the pex.
Pex is used in a lot of radiant heat applications. When we renovated our offices, the heating contractor used about 100' of pex for the baseboard heat connections.
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BobMCT wrote:

I think there is a special type of PEX that is supposed to be used for heating systems. It is called "oxygen barrier PEX" -- there are different types. The difference between oxygen barrier PEX and regular PEX is that the oxygen barrier PEX has a special barrier to keep oxygen from being able to diffuse into the system. When oxygen gets into a closed heating system, it can cause corrosion.
I don't know if it will really matter when all you are doing is putting in a 4 foot section of PEX. And, I don't know if they sell short lengths of oxygen barrier PEX like they do regular PEX.
Plus, this is just based on what I have read since I don't have any direct experience with this. Maybe others here will know for sure if what you should be using is oxygen barrier PEX.
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On Monday, July 15, 2013 11:43:46 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This.
That type of expansion joint is pretty standard on steam systems and sometimes on hot water.
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