Heating NOT cooling question

We live in the Pacific NW. Not terribly hot or cold. I've done searches on heat pumps and air handlers and mostly cooling issues are being addressed. Here's what we are looking at: BTW, 4 different quotes and opinions and each did a "heat loss" calculations on our home. 1. 2 1/2 ton American Standard 14 SEER Heat Pump 2. Coupled with a 3 ton variable speed air handler with a 31000 BTU capacity
Or: 1. 2 1/2 ton 14 SEER Heat Pump 2. Coupled with a 3 ton variable speed air handler with a 37000 BTU capacity
Or: 1. 3 ton 14 SEER 2. Coupled with a 3 ton variable speed air handler with a 37000 BTU capacity
Some more info: House was built in 1977, double paned windows, 13 registers, one story home. Since it is such a high ticket item, we want to do it right the first time. Thanks so much, Karel
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http://www.hvacopcost.com / http://198.147.238.24/ac_calc/default.asp
SEER is a seasonal cooling efficiency number. Has little to do with heating. The amount of time you plan to say in the home would have a lot to do with how good/expensive equipment you would want to purchase. FYI 14 SEER is the bottom of the line for new units come 2006.
Variable speed fans are nice, but more expensive. Some installers use them for humidity removal, I have. They help remove humidity, but a colder coil is really what you need for humidity removal, >25 F differential of supply and return.
You fail to mention the attic insulation, big factor in sizing a unit.
The installer that does the manual calculations, would be who I would choose. You fail to mention existing ducting or new. Assuming existing duct a calculation on the duct sizes so the air flow from your new air handler will really do what is supposed to do.
Quotes 1 and 2 are confusing. Both are 2.5 ton units, but different heat numbers. Is one of the quotes assuming another fuel for heat besides the heat pump?
Heat pumps do not heat very well under 45F. Some installers say 40F. If heat is really what your looking for this might not be the solution your looking for. A dual fuel heat system might be a better solution. Ya it is more money than a straight heat pump.
For sure pay for a scroll compressor. MUCH quieter if the compressor is ground mounted anywhere near a living area ask for a compressor blanket to be installed before you pay. The blankets are not standard on some lines and are not all that expensive, <$100 and 30 minutes to install. A compressor blanket can quiet a ground mount by up to 10 db.
Best of luck with your purchase.
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I didn't know there were variable speed fans.
When I need the next furnace, can I run the fan below the low speed that my current furnace/ac fan runs at? Or is that too slow?
That's the one thing about my furnace that bothers me, the noise of the fan. (I tried the other two connections to make sure it was on the lowest speed. It already was.)
Sometimes I close my bedroom door so I won't hear the fan. Somehow I don't hear it from the registers in the bedroom. Only the big return vent in the stairwell.
When
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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The variable speed is for the air handler (back up furnace - electric). The heat pump is 2.5 ton. The 16 SEER has a variable speed on their 3 ton. The 14 SEER heat pump doesn't have the variable speed. The air handler (furnace) has the different BTU. What I was told was that the smaller BTU has a smaller coil and therefore more air surface has a chance to gather more heat from the coils for better comfort. Also, the smaller (2.5 ton) heat pump would heat the house slower and more steady without spikes of cold and warm. Is this making any sense? I kind of understand but I'm also a bit confused. Karel
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