Heating Gasoline in a Microwave

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To be pedantic, a metal cup holding liquid will heat up.
I'm still wondering if, lacking a spark, gasoline vapors would ignite.
Harry K
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On Thursday, January 10, 2013 11:29:18 AM UTC-5, Harry K wrote:

I'm inclined to think not.
Flash point for gasoline is - 50 F, but flash point is the temperature at which a spark or flame will ignite it.
Autoignition temperature is + 495 F, and I doubt we'll see that in a microwave.
But I'll let mythbusters test it.
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good point. I didn't think the autoignition point would be so high.
Harry K
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I had visions of doing a test. Already threw out microwave, I don't know the conductivity of gas or the vapors. With high RF field it may arc, but that does not happen to the water vapors. There might be some micro arc hot spots within the interior.
Greg
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If there is a small sliver of metal -- aluminum foil for instance -- in the microwave, it will heat up, melt, and arc.
I have seen this when heating something in old plastic jars that were sealed with metal foil. When the foil is peeled away, it leaves slivers of metal around the top rim of the jar. If the jar is later used for keeping things in the fridge, and put in the microwave for heating up later, the metal fringe arcs over. THAT would give the spark if the plastic jar were filled with gasoline instead. However, for an explosion, it would have to happen when the gas-air concentration was correct. Otherwise it would just start a fire.
Hint: When using these plastic jars, take a knife and scrape away all the metal traces on the top rim......
Anyway, just thought I would mention it......
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I have a small one cup or so Stainless Thermos for my work lunch. It goes into the microwave daily. Hot soup and cool on the outside. No sparks to boot.
I do get the occasional "are you nuts?" look.
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On Thursday, January 10, 2013 12:48:50 PM UTC-5, Thomas wrote:
So the soup heats up but the metal doesn't? Interesting. I need to look for a junk microwave and try this again. I've never had sparks unless the metal had corners or sharp edges.
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look for a junk microwave and try this again. I've never had sparks unless the metal had corners or sharp edges. * * If you put a chinaware plate/cup in with a "gold" rim, the rim will explode and chip the plate. Ist hand experience
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A sealed container is not going to work. In microwaves, it's all about wavelength. If metal coincides with the proper length, it can form a short. Create effects. If it's not the correct length, it may not do anything. Try a 2.1 inch piece of foil, or 4.2 inch, vs a 2.6 inch.
A metal container with a 2.1 wide inch top, should allow the RF to energize the interior.
Greg
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Would it even get hot? Metal can, No water present.
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On 01/08/2013 04:22 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

In every microwave I have dismantled for parts (> 50 of them), I have yet to come across a motor that uses brushes inside of the oven; every one of them was an induction motor.
There is, however, a relay inside of each of them, and while the contacts are enclosed, I would suspect that they might not all be hermetically sealed units.
Jon
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