Heating duct through block wall?

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The heating contractor wants run a duct up from the cellar through the living room floor and then turn 90 degrees to go through the wall to the adjacent room that is on a slab. He says he'll box it in, but this will leave an obstruction 8 inches out into the living room floor. Any reason I can't remove a concrete block and come up through the sill plate and run the duct up inside the wall? Any reason the contractor won't do it?
Bob
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You need to make sure you won't cause any structural problems with the home, and you must maintain the same size duct all the way, with as few turns as possible.

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Bob wrote:

Same number of turns either way. He said it would be a lot of work to go through the block. I can rent a hammer chisel to cut the block and then cut the hole in the sill plate with a Sawzall in less time than it takes for the contractor to explain why he can't do it. Perhaps if I offered him the option that he can run the duct and I'll do the work of making the hole.
Bob

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Same number of turns either way. He said it would be a lot of work to go through the block. I can rent a hammer chisel to cut the block and then
cut the hole in the sill plate with a Sawzall in less time than it takes for the contractor to explain why he can't do it. Perhaps if I offered him the option that he can run the duct and I'll do the work of making the hole.
Bob
lazy contractor:( Are you SURE you trust him with the whole job??
The boxed in area he wanted to create would permanetely devalue your home:(:(
If he is cutting corners on such a obviuous thing what about what you cant see?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

couple of other heating contractors. I just wondered how far heating contractors go, and if this type of work was something that a heating contractor would consider as something that should be done by a general contractor.
    Bob
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Had the same problem 2 years back. HVAC contractor wanted to do the same thing but i stopped him after doing some research on the web. The solution i found was replacing the old water heater tank with a high efficiency 'just in time' heater (98% efficient and no flue required) by taguchi at cost of $800 canadian. This was plumbed in to handle the low profile radiators in that room (cheap, cost is $7 per linear foot and takes 3/4" copper pipe) total for these lightwieght rads was $125 for a 300 sq/ft addition. A few feet of copper pipe was needed and the hydronic system could be used in many ways. It heats our home water supply and does the heat via radiators in the addition. A simple valve stops the heat process when it is not needed.
wrote:

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wrote:

space at floor level) would be if I could painlessly bury it in the bottom foot of a built-in bookcase or something. Yeah, notching out a block wall and sill is a PITA, but sometimes there is no easy way to do a retrofit. I'll be facing something similar here when I replace the long-past-service-life furnace, and extend the ducts into the addition to get rid of this damn secondary wall furnace. But at least I have a decently deep crawl space under the addition- the only hard part will be getting through 2 poured foundation walls for the duct runs. How much does drilling 8-inch holes through reinforced concrete walls cost again? :^(
aem sends...
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If you're adding more than one or two branch ducts, be sure to do a Manual D, because you'll probably need to increase the size of your supply and return trunk ducts.
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Bob wrote:

    New heating system, not just a branch.
    Bob
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assistance. The bids I get will specify that I want a whole-house study, not just a light-bulb switchout. I know just enough to be dangerous, and this will probably be a 4-5 K job minimum, so I won't cry over a few hundred for the guy to do a site survey.
aem sends...
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ameijers wrote:

be paying close to $6000 for the entire job. I'm not crying over a few hundred dollars, that is not the issue. My concern is that everyone should do what they will be hired to do. Problem on the newsgroups is that as soon as someone mentions a problem, everyone thinks the guy is a DIY trying to go the cheapest route. This is not the case. I just want to make sure I'll be getting what I pay for.
    Bob
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Let each contractor do his own heat loss calculation. With today's computer programs, it doesn't take a long time. If the guy doesn't have a computer program, he can take the info to his local equipment wholesaler who will do it for him. Heat loss/gains are not an exact science. There are too many variables that can be entered into the calculations. The major one being infiltration. You can even come up with different numbers depending on the amount of people living in the house, and a lot of other stuff like trees. Do not discount the guy who comes back with the smallest load. Most home owners believe that bigger is better, and most contractors would rather sell you what you want rather than insist on a smaller size that they know would be better.

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I typically do that kind of work on a T&M basis. I only give firm quotes on a whole new duct system, because you never know what you're going to run into. On a small job it could end up taking twice as long, but with a bigger job, you can usually make up the time in another part of the job, so it evens out. If it's hollow block, you can knock it out in 5 minutes. Whenever possible, I use a chainsaw to cut out sill plates, but plan on ruining the chain if you hit something like a nail or cinderblock.

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Bob wrote:

This is a completely new system. We're talking in the $6000 price range, so I can't see someone not wanting to do it right. I'm not asking them to do it for nothing. If they said it would cost an extra $100 I'd have said yes. It appears they simply don't want to be bothered.
Bob
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When you say, "it appears they simply don't want to be bothered", who are "they"? Have you talked to the owner of the company? Have you signed a contract with them? Have they delivered any equipment to the property? Find out if the company did a heat loss/gain on the house. If they did, then they probably do ok work. They may just be worried about something structural.

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Bob wrote:

wondering if his lack of enthusiasm for doing work was related to something structural or to cost savings on his part. After talking with the general contractor, I'm convinced I need to find a different heating contractor. I didn't want to be calling one heating person after another if this was something that shouldn't be done, but it appears the first guy simply wants a quick job, in and out, no muss no fuss and collect his money.
    Bob
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If the first guy was recommended by the builder, then definitely get more estimates.

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maybe ground dampness, insulating considerations, loss of heat, efficient ducts run thru conditioned space not attics and basement crawl spaces. read all the links that apply at this site as they pertain to your who-what-where-when-why-and how for your climate, construction style, ground environment: http://www.buildingscience.com/resources/homeowner.htm
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wrote:

Not that you're disaggreeeing....
If I read correcttly, they dno't give any reason. You're reasons might be good -- I'm not there to tell -- but if they can't express what their reason is, I'd be very unhappy.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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I have some ducts run through a block wall in my home. It works out well since the standard HVAC ducts are 8" high (with varying widths), so up to a 16" wide duct fits in the space of one block. It's very easy to remove blocks with a hammer and chisel.
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