Heater servicing

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Another question for you and the group - I looked at the model number and it's a Magic Chef G8A75DC30-15. This obviously is not the suspect Magic Chef ENG model, but I'm concerned that the model number formats looks so dissimilar. I'm sure I'm copying this down for a plate that says "Magic Chef" "Furnace", and this is after the field that is indicated to be the "Model Number". Could ENG be short for something that I should be inferring from my furnace's model number?
Right now I'm thinking about just replacing the furnace all together. It's 20 years old and clearly not in great shape. I'm planning on living here for 10+ years, so I don't mind making the investment.
The A/C and hot air come from the same system (obviously the compressor is outside). Is it advisable to change both at the same time?
Thanks, PB
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No, I think you are in the clear. You furnace model breaks down like this G8A-- 80+ gas horizontal series 75-----75,000 BTU gas input D--direct drive blower C--?? 30---2-1/2 or 3 ton a/c ariflow -15--??
Seems to be a typical furnace model number.

Twenty years is a decent life span for most gas burning equiptment (except boilers) Most heating guys would tell you not to expect a horizontal or counterflow unit to last even that long. However, if it gets a clean bill of health, then at least it's up to you to decide if you want an new one or not.

The main factor that will come into play when deciding whether to replace both is whether the evaporator (the indoor section of the A/C) will match up to your new heating equipment without a lot of wasted ductwork and labor. In the old days we would just go with the evaporator new to match the heating equipment (approx. $150.00-$200.00 extra), but with the new minumum 13 SEER standards in place thanks to the govt., that would make a gross mismatch of old condenser and new evaporator. I would guess you'll just have to get bids and weigh your options based on the saleman's assessment of your given situation. Another consideration is that is you spend enough on high efficiency equipment, you can qualify for up to $1,500.00 of your taxes for 2009. Consult your tax advisor about wherther you want to consider that. Then again, maybe you already spent money on other qualifying items and have reached the max threshold for this year. Either way, I'm glad to see that you can make the decision at your leisure, and not scramble for winter. You know there's really no such thing as fall special pricing. Just negotioate your best deal when you are ready, or get the thing serviced for winter and forget about it.

HTH, Lefty
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Thanks for all the tips. It sounds like I should plan to get the system replaced at some point. The questions become a) do I proactively replace the system and b) is it worth servicing if I'm going to be replacing at some point soon anyway.
I've got a CO2 detector, so hopefully that will catch anything that goes awry. Is there anything else I should worry about with waiting for it to go bad?
Also, we have two HVAC systems - one for the first floor/basement and one for the attic (the one with the rust is in the attic). Even if one goes bad, the other will hopefully hold us over for a few days. Of course, the one in the basement is 20 years old too, so lightning could strike at the same exact time!
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