heater guy says replace furnace/AC

Page 3 of 3  

On Nov 5, 3:50 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, that often factors into my own decision making process - the unknown quality of a new product. Unfortunately, anymore, it seems like a lot of the time they "don't build 'em like they used to" and rebuilding an older product actually results in a better result than replacing.
Of course, you never know if that is actually the case until you've bought the new product and discarded the old...
nate
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 Nov 2009 06:33:09 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Hi. OP here. Guess what, the thing seems to be working again. Perhaps we had a sticky thermostat, or fiddling the works broke loose some dirt on a sensor, or something. Perhaps I didn't know what a normal cycle looks like. Perhaps the repair guys didn't, either. I'm pretty sure it looked like it was misbehaving more, with the front panel off. Then again, perhaps the repair guy did know, and was yanking my thermostat from the start.
I also Googled Carrier 58SS and see a lot of similar complaints about similar age units - with no clear answers. May be a variety of things that fail, at this age.
Anyway, looks like it doesn't have to be replaced *today*, but I'm better for the education, and will keep the estimates on file.
J.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As I remember, the OP is in Los Angeles area. And they want ten grand to replace it. Well, gee, for half that price I could fly out, rent a car, and do the repairs. Sounds like either a bad board, or a flame sensor. Could also visit my uncle who lives near LA. And some cousins down the coast, to Santa Cruz, last I knew. Leave the car, fly back to Rochester.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 4, 1:07 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Got a buddy in Rochester, I know slim chance but do you know Bill F Gurney.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sadly, no. Be interesting if I did.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's always easier and cheaper for a big company to hire teams of sellers whose only goal is to scare you into getting a replacement. It takes far less skilled labor to rip out something old and replace it with new gear than it does to diagnose and fix a problem. If you're a rip and replace shop, you don't have to have as many skilled mechanics, don't have to worry about finding parts for old units, don't have to worry about your repairs being up to code and don't have to take liability for anything that goes wrong after they've worked on/tampered with your unit.
The problem is that things aren't engineered to last forever anymore, so your 1984 unit is well likely to need replacement. Furnaces are relatively simple devices. Even so, 25 years is a lot of "miles" for a unit that was probably not built to last forever as some of the older units were.
Compare the heat exchanger on an old Chrylser Air Temp to a modern furnace and you'll see why so many new exchangers die young. The old units were massive (I had one that was the size of a VW bug) and it took moisture build up a long, long time to eat through the exchanger. But lasting a long time is a blessing and a curse. Technology moves so quickly that maintaining old equipment often doesn't make good economic sense as newer equipment is often incredibly more efficient than older designs.
I'm going to have to replace my unit soon, so I'm in the same boat. Old furnace, old A/C and high climate control bills. Others have given very good advice. Shop around, check the local consumer protection agency, check the estimate they give you on the net, and beware the vendor who tries to do what that double AA transmission franchise is famous for. They lowball the price and then jack it when your furnace has been removed and the need for extra equipment appears. You're stuck without heat and are pretty much bent over the railing at that point.
Only careful checking of references and complaints can help you avoid that sort of scamming scum. Furnaces, water heaters, A/Cs, mattresses and other relatively "few per lifetime" purchases are favorites of dishonest vendors. People buy them so infrequently that they don't have the same sense about what the fair price should be as they do milk, gasoline or even new cars. As a result, vendors know there's a terrible tendency for consumers to overpay.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 3 Nov 2009 22:03:32 -0500, "Robert Green"

Yes, the truth seems to be a little grey, and because it's "few per lifetime" (been zero for me, I've mostly been a renter), I have no real judgement.
But I'm glad I can ask here, and get some good advice!
Thanks.
J.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.