Heat your home with coal

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HeyBub wrote:

I'll wait for the coal gasification. Coal gas is a much better fuel. In the 1800's and early 1900's some eastern towns had public coal gas piped right to their houses. I don't know why they stopped it other than the occasional explosion. Today's technology would reduce the safety issues.
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Van Chocstraw
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Van Chocstraw wrote:

Considering that they still can't make natural gas service safe, I certainly wouldn't want to consider yet another killer fuel piped into unsuspecting people's homes. Seems I've seen a report of a residential gas explosion with fatalities every few days lately.
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Dont get out of bed today, you might fall and die.
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Pete-
Could you explain....

For what it does, NG seems very safe....a lot safer than many modern conveniences. How many latent lung cancer deaths did coal cause & NG use eliminate?
cheers Bob
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can you cite links to these alledged stories?
s

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Steve Barker wrote:

They've all been on CNN.com in the last month or two. You can search there for "house explosion" or similar to find them.
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wrote:

Some old flex lines used to connect stoves are known now to not last forever and have caused major leaks, Chicago banned that type years ago. People used them for water heaters and who knows. Many houses never see a maintenance man to check anything. CO detectors have saved lives, Ng detectors are a good idea. Not unknown is having a car catch fire when refilling gasolene in winter from static electricity. I just fell on the ice last night, maybe I should never go out again, naw I just found all my sheet metal screws and screwed them into my boots, it worked great.
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Pete C. wrote:

Explosions from natural gas have to rank somewhere near plane crashes. In other words not that frequently.
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Exactly. Yes they do occur and when the do, it makes the national news. Millions of homes have NG and never have a problem. I grew up with it and I'd go back in a second if it was nearby.
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George wrote:

Just do a search on CNN.com to see all the examples in the last few months.
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while you're at it, search for auto fatalities. Gonna quit driving also?
s

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Steve Barker wrote:

It's a matter of practical, safer alternatives. There are few alternatives to autos, unless you live in a big city, but there are plenty of safer alternatives to nat gas appliances / heating.
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Pete C. wrote:

"safer" is debatable, and none of them work as well. You could make a case for a ground loop heat pump for heating if you live somewhere where that would be practical, but nothing beats a gas water heater or stove.
nate
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

It's a "ground source" or "geothermal" heat pump, and they are practical pretty much everywhere. There are several different ground loop configurations (vertical, horizontal, trenched coil) that fit most any site. They can readily do hot water as well. In areas of relatively moderate temperatures, an air source heat pump is more economical.
A key thing to consider here is that high efficiency electric powered HVAC is somewhat "future proof", and "RE friendly" as both gas and oil are only going to get more costly, while most renewable sources like solar PV, wind, hydro, tidal, etc. are electric sources that can power the high efficiency heat pump.
As for the stove, gas being better only applies to cooktop burners, electric ovens are best. On the cooktop end, it seems that induction "burners" are becoming more popular, and they compete well with gas burners, and are once again an electric powered source.
Right now I have a dual fuel stove, electric ovens and LP gas burners up top. I have a combo CO/Gas detector in the vicinity, so should there be a leak I should have enough warning to evacuate.
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Pete C. wrote:

yabbut, if you, say, live in a condo, you may not have any ground to put one in...
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Condos and apartments have been built with geothermal heat pumps too. It's becoming more common now that people are paying more attention to energy efficiency.
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I did the search on CNN. They were in the Ukraine, a pub in Ireland, etc. I'm not going to bother looking for statistics, but if you look at fatalities by various sources, I think NG is way down on the list. A few years ago we did have a house in my town get leveled though. There was a very small leak and someone probing for it made a big gas leak that seeped into the house. Human error caused a small problem to become a big one.
I'd still switch to gas if I could. We use propane for cooking.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

You didn't search very well, all that I were referring to were in the US. I believe one was in MA, another in CA, etc. Not up to the rate of fatal auto accidents, but far above the rate of plane crashes.
I still find it incredible that they have required smoke detectors for years, and now CO detectors, but there are still no requirements for residential gas detectors, even though gas detectors have been standard equipment in RVs for years.
I have LP that fuels my cooktop only (electric ovens), and I have a combo CO/Gas detector in the vicinity. While I like to cook on gas, I can also cook just fine on electric and I only have it here because it came with the house.
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yah and they're all junk. Most have to be disconnected because they give false alarms constantly and run batteries down.
s

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I have a combo gas/CO detector in my basement and it has never falsed. I *do* have to remember to unplug it and take the battery out whenever doing certain jobs though... was cleaning up some brake components and apparently one little squirt of brakleen is enough to set it off...
nate
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