Heat duct using only silver tape no screws, and oven hood vent question.


Hi, I don't know that much about home repair in general. I am having some work done, and I want to know if it is done correctly or not.
I am having a heating vent installed in a new finished office. He is using metal duct, but he is only taping it closed and together. It is heat tape with red print on it but he is not using any screws. I question him about this because all of my other duct work uses screws, but he tells me that using tape is better better because it prevents all leaks? My question is, if this is really the right way to do it?
And my oven hood vent, we originally agreed to create a new vent for it through my vaulted ceiling, then he said we could go through the wall, and then through my unheated attic. I was fine with that, but upon further investigation, I found out he connected it to my bathroom 4" bathroom duct. I talked to him, and he will change it to have it's own duct. He also used an insulated flexible duct, when I did research, I found it stated that you should use hard metal duct. He said it was better to use flexible insulated duct so you don't get return cold air? Is this right, or should I ask for rigid metal duct?
Can you just glue and screw plywood to a cement basement or do you need a moisure barrier between the plywood and cement? He is doing this to raise the level of my office to the same level as the tile in my hallway so I can float engineer hardwood on it.
Just want to make sure I am getting my home improvement done correctly. Thanks,
Lulu
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Normally for air ducts I use both. I would guess, that if the ducts were otherwise secure without the tape, that should be enough. If not, I would want both.

You got a real winner there. Rigid only!

Ill bet the flooring company will specify a vapor barrier. I would demand one.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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| Hi, I don't know that much about home repair in general. I am having | some work done, and I want to know if it is done correctly or not. | | I am having a heating vent installed in a new finished office. He is | using metal duct, but he is only taping it closed and together. It is | heat tape with red print on it but he is not using any screws. I | question him about this because all of my other duct work uses screws, | but he tells me that using tape is better better because it prevents | all leaks? My question is, if this is really the right way to do it?
no it is not the correct way the round ducts should have 3 screws in them. rectangular ducts should have 4 screws. then sealed with duct seal NOT heat tape. heat tape is for the insulation that goes over the ducting.
| | And my oven hood vent, we originally agreed to create a new vent for | it through my vaulted ceiling, then he said we could go through the | wall, and then through my unheated attic. I was fine with that, but | upon further investigation, I found out he connected it to my bathroom | 4" bathroom duct. I talked to him, and he will change it to have | it's own duct. He also used an insulated flexible duct, when I did | research, I found it stated that you should use hard metal duct.
stainless steel ducting is best for grease from a hood. never use plastic or vinyl ducting for a hood. the shorter the distance of the ducting, the more efficient it will be.
He | said it was better to use flexible insulated duct so you don't get | return cold air?
He is an ass or you are a troll which is it? an in-line damper is installed for back drafts
Is this right, or should I ask for rigid metal | duct?
stainless steel ducting is best for grease from a hood. never use plastic or vinyl ducting for a hood. insist on metal.
| | Can you just glue and screw plywood to a cement basement or do you | need a moisure barrier between the plywood and cement?
plywood on a cement floor? why bother? install the new floor directly over the concrete with thicker padding for comfort.. vapor barrier over concrete - absolutely not
He is doing | this to raise the level of my office to the same level as the tile in | my hallway so I can float engineer hardwood on it. | | Just want to make sure I am getting my home improvement done | correctly. Thanks,
sounds like you really picked a winner to do the work for you. good luck with this project (I mean, your contractor sounds like a science project)
| | Lulu |
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