Heat anticipator setting...

Ok, I messed with my thermostat and screwed with the heat anticipator. I want to set it back, but don't remember where it was to begin with.
I've checked my gas valve and it's rated for a 0.3amp draw. From everything I see online, I should set the heat anticipator to 0.3 and make adjustments if needed.
Sound right?
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Noozer wrote:

The right way is to amp the current through the white lead and set the anticipator to match. If the gas valve is the only load on the low voltage heating circuit then set it to 0.3. If there are other loads as well then 0.3 won't be correct. Just put it somewhere in the middle and go to bed. It isn't a perfect science; the anticipator only adjusts the length of the on cycle, digital stats don't even have an anticipator.
hvacrmedic
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Under normal circumstances, yes.

everything
adjustments
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if your furnace is staying on too long, i.e. long cycles, set your anticipator for higher resistance (= lower current setting ) ...i.e so it generates more heat in the thermo and shuts the furnace off sooner....
if your furnace is short cycling, not staying on long enought, set your anticipator for a lwer resistance (=higher current setting) so that is generates less heat in the thermo and lets your furnace stay on longer
The anticipator is simply a small heat generating element near the thermosdat that creates a little local heat when the furnace is on... the adjustment control how much heat and therefore how long it takes for the thermosdadt to eb "satisfied" then the furnace comes on..
Mark
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Low anticipator settings seem to burn out Taco zone valve power heads. When they are set at .9, it seems to solve the problem. Never could figure out why, and never bothered to call Taco. I always just figured it had something to do with resistance.

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Bob wrote:

I guess I've never seen Taco valves on standard t-stats. Maybe that's why. :)
hvacrmedic

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Around me, they rarely use the Taco thermostats. People always seem to have a T87F.

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Bob wrote:

Change them.
hvacrmedic

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That's what I'm planning on doing. I'm switching to all digital stats. The Honeywell T8775C1005 comes with a 4074 FAB resistor for use with Taco zone valves. That way there's no anticipator for the customer to mess with.

on
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Never hear of cycle rate adjustment, Bob? A couple button pushes, and its changed Bubba

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