HDD magnets used to repair clothes dryer

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I've never seen one that was anywhere near as strong as a hard drive magnet.
Isaac
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Nothing you're likely to find in common motors, but very high performance normal motors, and especially linear motors, use larger version of the highest strength latest rare earth magnets.
--- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Mirror: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/ Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/ +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/lasersam.htm | Mirror Sites: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/F_mirror.html
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The last time I replaced a disk drive, I couldn't find a means of opening it to grab the magnets. It wasn't Torx, security Torx, allen, or anything else I had in my reasonably well-equipped set of wrenches. Finally conceded defeat and discarded it.
Did I have an oddball (don't remember the brand) or was it simply a matter of me being an idiot and not having a common tool?
Art
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snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) writes:

You'd have to describe the screw heads or whatever. I've yet to come up against a dead harddrive I couldn't get open reasonably non-destructively.
--- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Mirror: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/ Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/ +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/lasersam.htm | Mirror Sites: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/F_mirror.html
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wrote:
: snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) writes: :
:> >I just had to post this. :> :> The last time I replaced a disk drive, I couldn't find a means of opening :> it to grab the magnets. It wasn't Torx, security Torx, allen, or anything :> else I had in my reasonably well-equipped set of wrenches. Finally conceded :> defeat and discarded it. :> :> Did I have an oddball (don't remember the brand) or was it simply a matter of :> me being an idiot and not having a common tool? : :You'd have to describe the screw heads or whatever. I've yet to come up :against a dead harddrive I couldn't get open reasonably non-destructively. : I read a post from someone suggesting that some of these drives may have some toxic chemicals in them. Is this true or false?
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Arthur Shapiro ( snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com) writes:

I've come across that, though I don't know whether they are odd or just sized I don't have.
If you're just scrapping the drives, drill out the screws.
Another thing I've found useful, if the heads aren't recessed, is to use a cutting wheel on my "Dremel tool" to put a slot on it so I can use a regular screwdriver.
Michael
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wrote:

conceded
of
A lot of them are metric torx.
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On Wed, 04 May 2005 03:28:28 GMT, "James Sweet"

Is there such a thing as a SAE vs metric torx? I see only a tool ID number but no dimensions specified.
One item one should check though is if there is a centre pin in the screw fastener's recess. If so it will require a driver tool bit with a hole in the center to accept this pin. I think the tools are described as security bit sets. When these security fasteners first came out there were no tools available but I was able to get around it by drilling the hole with a dental burr (drill bit) in the torx driver.
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If you don't plan to reuse the fasteners as a security measure, you can usually break the pin off and then use a regular tool to remove them. Use either needlenose pliers or a hammer and punch.
WT
wrote:

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Arthur Shapiro wrote:

opening
anything
conceded
matter of

I had the same problem. Just use some wire cutters to get the screws broken loose then they can be removed easily with some strategically placed explosives. The magnets are great for finding tiny springs in the carpet. Did you know that a magnet stops working when it's heated? You can stick one to the burner grate and turn on the flame and it will fall off. (and never really recovers either) Cheers Davy
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On 4 May 2005 04:05:22 -0700, "Ignorant genius"
:Arthur Shapiro wrote:
:> >I just had to post this. :> :> The last time I replaced a disk drive, I couldn't find a means of :opening :> it to grab the magnets. It wasn't Torx, security Torx, allen, or :anything :> else I had in my reasonably well-equipped set of wrenches. Finally :conceded :> defeat and discarded it. :> :> Did I have an oddball (don't remember the brand) or was it simply a :matter of :> me being an idiot and not having a common tool? :> :> Art : : :I had the same problem. Just use some wire cutters to get the screws :broken loose then they can be removed easily with some strategically :placed explosives. The magnets are great for finding tiny springs in :the carpet. Did you know that a magnet stops working when it's heated? :You can stick one to the burner grate and turn on the flame and it will :fall off. (and never really recovers either) Cheers :Davy
That's probably because the magnetic dipoles whose cumlulative magnetic field give the magnet its net power are able to rearrange position when the metal gets hot enough. Once their original orientation is lost, they never regain it when cooled. Never, that is, unless they cool in a strong magnetic field (which would cause them all to line up parallel again before the cooling process)!
Dan
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Search on "Curie Temperature".
--- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Mirror: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/ Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/ +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/lasersam.htm | Mirror Sites: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/F_mirror.html
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Arthur Shapiro wrote:

I ran into the same situation, but wasn't willing to simply trash the drive (security reasons). So I drilled out the screws until I could get inside. Cute little platters - I hated to bend them all up by jamming a screwdriver into them ...
Bill Jeffrey
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Maybe you can use them around your shop. They're probably the flattest surfaces you've ever touched.
Isaac
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Dan wrote:

Yeah, they're pretty amazing. I sometimes carry a pair around in to play with. Don't get them anywhere near magnetic media, of course, and don't let small children handle them unless they're firmly stuck together. I've seen people injure themselves, as well....
jak

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Be careful with those. They're very brittle, and can shatter when they snap together. You might think that the magnetic field would control the shards, but it doesn't.
When the magnets crash together and shatter, the strength goes way down, and the shards come out *really fast*.
Isaac
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I once used a motor from an old dryer to fix a hard drive.
No, Really!
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One of those huge cabinet drives that held about 5mb and had a good sized induction motor driving the spindle?
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On Wed, 04 May 2005 04:33:00 GMT, "James Sweet"

My memory is fading since I last serviced those 20MB HDs some 20 years ago. They weighed at least 100 lbs and took two guys to lift it because there's no way to put one's arms around one to do any lifting. It would also have hurt many backbones. The drive's mass was a design decision to provide inertia to dampen out any outside vibrations such as someone slamming a door or a heavy guy walking nearby. Plus that voice coil's seek operations shook the whole drive like a rat caught by a terrier. The RW head was the size of a stick of gum and it provided us service guys a good paying job because they crashed often enough for the computer customer to pay big bucks to be on a service contract. I think the platters were 14 inch diameter and when the RW head touched the surface it gouged out a deep groove into the aluminium.
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And don't forget those alignment packs that cost something like $1500 and usually got trashed because someone missed replacing one of the heads that crashed. :( :)
The drives were tough though. Someone gave us a couple of CDC washing machine type drives but they were several blocks away. So, we wheeled over city streets just on their casters. Powered right up and wored for several years without problems. :)
--- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Mirror: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/ Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/ +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/lasersam.htm | Mirror Sites: http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/REPAIR/F_mirror.html
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