Having Problems Finding The Door

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David Marks...? Hmmm. David Marks is an excellent woodworker. I can't believe he's advising anyone to built a single slab door. Okay, thanks for posting it. Let me peruse the article.

Your reading comprehension is seriously flawed. David Marks built a standard paneled door from a nice wood. You ignored straightforward descriptions and took away a totally erroneous impression of that article.
A couple of excerpts from that article: "We cut our panel stock from a single long board to keep the flowing grain-patterns intact."
Notice he said one long _board_ was cut for the _panels_. There was no mention of a huge ass slab at all!
"Once the panel stock has been cut, it should be stacked on wood stickers -- thin strips of scrap wood -- to allow the wood to acclimate to the environment and humidity of the shop. Ideally, the wood should be allowed to acclimate for about 2 weeks to stabilize the wood. Allowing for wood-movement is an important issue when making doors. A solid-wood door of this size may "move" as much as 1/4-inch over the width-span of the door as seasons and humidity change. This can cause door-sticking or warping and cracking of the finished door. The frame-and-panel construction of this door allows the structure to be built to accommodate the movement of the wood."
He's saying exactly the same thing I was saying about wood movement. That is not surprising as wood does not change it's fookin physical properties depending on who is working it! How can you read that and not understand such a perfectly clear description?!
I am not trying to beat up on you, but start with some projects that are within you skill range - this isn't one of them.
R
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Ron wrote: ...

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And that's _also_ a conventional frame and panel door, also w/ a center stile (he uses "muntin" which I've always reserved for the thin vertical which separates lights in a window but that's ok, they're the same purpose--make it so there is sufficient structure and a way to allow for the inevitable movement that will occur) so the panels aren't wide at all, again.
In fact, "The stock pieces for the upper and lower panels (figure C) were cut to the same width -- 9-1/2 inches." Note, in fact, he resaws the material from full thickness to get a bookmatched pair for each upper and lower set of panels. The article doesn't say it quite right, probably, in that it says he resawed them for 3/4 panels _after_ taking the 8/4 material to 6/4 which would leave him thin--undoubtedly he actually resawed them before full thicknessing but after initial planing so could see to select grain clearly.
Where in the world you got the idea of a full-width slab for a door is beyond ken...
I'm still curious (altho far less so now the concept has been debunked) of who this was that supposedly "went under" and what they were actually doing...
--
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On Jun 16, 10:37am, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

I had just seen an article where a guy was making 1-1/2" thick jarrah wood doors. Unfortunately, he was also the sole supplier of the panels listed in the article; when I went to see about them all I got was a dead link, leaving me stuck with what looks like a really great project but no way to finish it. I was hoping for once to be able to find decent wood panels without having to try and glue smaller panels together. But it seems like it's easier to find weapons grade plutonium than a nice, wide, piece of wood. ;-(
Ron
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On Jun 16, 1:37 pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Hmmm. I guess the retard is you after all, eh?
R
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You take the same wood used for the rails and stiles and glue it together to the width you want.
It may be possible to find a single piece 32" wide, but it would probably cost as much as the house.
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On Mon 16 Jun 2008 04:18:31a, Ron told us...

Uh, doors usually have a knob on each side and open either into or out of a room. :-) Couldn't resist, because I don't have a clue what you need.
--
Wayne Boatwright
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