Have you looked ...

At the prices they want for prefab shower stalls ?? Prefab bases start at around 600 bucks , surrounds 300 bucks and up . Looks like I'm going to be building a tile shower ... materials should run around $275-$325 and labor will be ...me . Sure glad I said yes when a former employer asked if I wanted to work with the tile guy !
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Snag



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On 12/14/2013 1:51 PM, Snag wrote:

The bases are expensive, but that is what I'm using. My reasoning is I'll appreciate it in 5 or 15 years if it does not leak like grouted tile has the potential to do. I have a Swanstone base and will tile the walls.
Sink will also be Swanstone on a cherry vanity, Kohler faucets and toilet. Shower door will be 3/8" plate glass.
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"Snag" wrote in message
At the prices they want for prefab shower stalls ?? Prefab bases start at around 600 bucks , surrounds 300 bucks and up . Looks like I'm going to be building a tile shower ... materials should run around $275-$325 and labor will be ...me . Sure glad I said yes when a former employer asked if I wanted to work with the tile guy !
--
Snag



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WW wrote:

Snag. You will never be sorry if you go for the molded surround type. We have had two homes with theses. easy to clean, no mildew or leak problems. Don't let cost defer you for something that is trouble free. Remember > you must live with it. WW
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The problem is that our budget won't stretch far enough to spend nearly a thousand bucks on the shower . And having done a lot of tile work , I know which grouts to use ... acrylic modified products are much more mildew-resistant than older grouts .
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Snag



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On 12/14/2013 3:29 PM, Snag wrote:

If the base works out you will be OK. but my concern would be that suspended wood floor could move and eventually cause a crack.
As for the walls, I agree that tile is the way to go. The molded surrounds are very good, but just don't have the luxury look of tile. I'm not only going to tile the shower, but the other walls for 4 1/2 feet with a 3" glass mosaic trim. I started out to do the shower, but the entire bathroom is being done.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

A properly done tile shower floor is not likely to crack . Useta be that most leaks were caused by degraded shower pans , lead would get eaten away by electrolysis , fiber/tar was always a crap shoot . The new vinyl stuff is great , easy to install and lasts until forever . And the first place I used overkill was in the support system . Double 2x10/plywood sandwich beams 8 feet apart supported every 8 feet on 4x4 posts set in concrete and 2x8 joists on top of them crossblocked in 3 places . This floor does not move .
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On 12/14/2013 2:29 PM, Snag wrote:

Are you using a hardener additive? I use it on small concrete and grout jobs and it works fantastic. I was thinking about using it on my next br tile job.
http://www.quikrete.com/ProductLines/ConcreteAcrylicFortifier.asp
I used a acrylic hardener full strength (no water just hardener) on a counter job I did too. It helps keep stains out. The stuff makes grout incredibly strong. Really doesn't cost that much either for small jobs.
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gonjah wrote:

I like the latex additives . Gives the grout some flex and helps keep stuff from soaking into the grout . Huh , just looked up the MSDS on your link above , it is latex additive too . As Dobie Gillis would say "Good shit , Maynard !".
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On 12/14/2013 7:30 PM, Snag wrote:

I've been impressed with quikrete products. It wasn't what I used on my counter but it was a similar product. I've never used the quikrete hardener full strength. A test would probably be prudent.
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and it became a constant pain to keep the grout clean, repeated repairs with the grout especially along the inside corners and along the pan level. Then along came the time (7-8 yrs ago) when the shower was torn out during a bathroom rebuild--I ended up with a Sterling glass corner shower (a base, two walls and the door). I don't remember the cost but it's worth every penny--just about non-existent maintenance (nothing to repair), easy to keep clean, cosmetically looks great. Think again, amortize the cost over the next few years and today's cost will not seem too high a price--especially five years from now when you're working away cleaning, scraping and replacing grout . And after all that work you still can't it to look like new any more (and the wife is the first one to let you know). MLD
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On 12/14/2013 10:51 AM, Snag wrote:

I faced that same realization a few years ago when I was looking to redo my bath/shower. I was optimistic about the ~$100 panels, but then I went to the store and discovered that they were flimsy plastic, and overpriced at that.
I ended up doing a tub to ceiling tile job that I am very proud of, and it turned out to be a good decision. Lots of work, but it was worth it.
Jon
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Snag wrote:

Screw tile, too many grout joints to clean. Look to concrete countertops i.e. fab shower wall panels just like the countertops, and fab a shower pan base similarly.
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Pete C. wrote:

Interesting idea , but I suspect my wife would balk at a concrete shower . Even if it was dyed interesting colors . We do , however , plan on making extensive use of the native rocks . There's a reason they call it Stone County ...
--

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Snag wrote:

Just show her pics of concrete countertops that have embedded colored glass pieces and bits of aluminum and brass sparklies...
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This is what I intend doing. I bought the drain, just née the fabric.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLq7ogxDRr0

Greg
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wrote:

precautions are needed against dust) and lasts forever. Greenboard was never recommended for wet locations.
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Damp, yes. Wet, no. Blue board is better but still not acceptable. Before cementatious board, tile was done with lathe and mortar.
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Nonsense. Many of tile jobs with a tub & shower were done on plain ole drywall in the 70's.
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wrote:

They were. They all fell apart in a decade. It was never a recommended use of drywall. Learn something, sometime.
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On 12/19/2013 9:54 PM, G. Troyer wrote:

True. I bet there are zero left.
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