Have you had to replace your fuel pump?

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On Oct 11, 4:25pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

If he even got that far. With all the engine controls today that are interdependent on each other, who knows what happens when there are no longer injectors. Like what does the engine control computer then do with timing? My guess is the computer is going to go into some limp home mode, if he's lucky... But I sure wouldn't have any dreams that the engine is going to run optimized and perform like one wants it to.
I think the claim that the fuel injectors suck more gas than a carb is bogus too....
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 14:21:06 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

In some states, anyway, (VT and NY included) *any* changes to the original equipment is an automatic fail. Even the wrong engine for the car, even though some of that model came with the engine, is an automatic fail. ...if they notice, anyway.

Of course it is. There is no way a mechanical monster is going to be a computer controlled injector and ignition.
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On 10/11/2012 3:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote: ...

Not really; they sit in a canister that holds fuel around the motor for cooling as the tank level falls...it's still full even when it ceases to pick up out of the tank.
You'd have to never let the tank get below between half to three-quarters to have fuel level around it on the PU I just replaced the tank on I noticed...I expect most are about the same.
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On Thursday, October 11, 2012 4:32:28 AM UTC-4, (unknown) wrote:

I actually see a different problem at work here...the fact that manufacturers seem to put absolutely no thought into designing things to be easy to work on (or actively try to make them difficult so you have to take your car to the dealer for service, I'm not sure which). This is without a doubt different from 50 years ago. Certainly some of it has to do with packing things in tightly to save space but not nearly all.
The in-tank fuel pump on my car was an exception though. I think it took me about 30 minutes to replace (didn't have to drop the tank or remove anything else as far as I remember). I could have done it in 10 if I had a lift AND I knew what I was doing. That was at least 5 years ago, and I think I pulled the original 1994 pump. I don't remember what I paid for the new one, maybe $75 at most.
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 03:31:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@america.com wrote:

I've never had to repair one - and my vehicles have all, up untill the last 2, gone well over 200,000km.
I've replaced quite a few for customers in the past - most of them too darn cheap to replace fuel filters.

Either you are getting bad pumps or bad gas and are too cheap to change filters.

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On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 22:55:23 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I don't recall seeing fuel filter replacement as a required service in the manual. I'm not use where they are these days either, but they are not easily accessed like days of old.
The tank in my '91 Regal rusted out on top (sand and salt) and had to be replaced. The shop replaced the filter at that time because they had to remove it anyway.
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On vehicles that still use a return system to control fuel pressure a plugged filter will increase the strain on the pump by a factor of up to 5 or more. Deadhead systems cannot build excessive pump pressure.
If a system is designed to run 45 PSI and 100 GPH, and it ends up running 120psi and 20GPH, something is going to give. Usually the pump. (numbers may not be 100% accurate, but the principal is .)
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On Oct 12, 4:30pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

45PSI and 100 GPH would be one hell of car. How many HP engine is that? 10,000?
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On Saturday, October 13, 2012 8:10:55 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I can't speak to whether the 100 GPH number is actually accurate, but he's talking about a recirculating system where most of the fuel goes back to the tank...
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snipped-for-privacy@america.com wrote:

Do you have a habit of filling up when fuel tank is near empty? If so the answer is there. I never let tank go below quarter full. Never had a failed fuel pump in the past 20 years.
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I had one replaced in a 93 Dakota around 115k miles. You could tell the brushes were intermittent. Then it became weak showing going up hills. I was always under the assumption they go in that general milage frame. Darn gas gauge went before that, but new pump fixed that too.
Greg
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wrote:

OTOH- I let it get as low as I dare- and I haven't had any problems either-- Last 20 years were a dodge Reliant, a ford Taurus and a Chevy Impala. [and my wife had a couple Escorts and an old VW in those years--and she's worse than me]
Someone mentioned 'luck' earlier & I tend to agree.
Jim
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 03:31:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@america.com wrote:

Untril a year ago I had a '95 Chrysler LeBaron with fuel injection for the previous 9 years and never had a problem with the fuel pump. (one time after a 6 hour drive with no stop for the last 2 or 3 hours, the pump sounded so loud I was sure it was dying, but it was still working 3 years later, so I guess it was just ringing in my ears from road noise.)
Now I have a 2000 Toyota with FI and haven't had trouble.
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wrote:

The ONLY fuel pump I have ever replaced was on my 95 Silverado at about 250,000 miles...Changed the tank too once the guy at the shop got it out so we could see the rusted top..Changed the fuel lines as well..Still running it , 270,000+ on it...You could NEVER get that out of older cars and trucks...100,000 was tops then if you were lucky..From what I have done and heard fuel level in the tank means nothing in regards to pump life..I let mine get down to almost empty all the time...Ditto for SWMBO's 2006 Hyundai Elantra...The ONLY complaint about cars today I have is what others have said about working on them and the fact they ALL look the same now...BORING...Nobody writes songs about cars today either..No charactor I guess and todays music is pretty much fake and sucks...LOL..
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