Have you had to replace your fuel pump?

Page 1 of 6  
If you own a fuel injected vehicle, have you had to replace your (in the gas tank) fuel pump in the last 2 years?
I'm asking this because everyone I know who owns a fuel injected vehicle has had this problem in the last year or two. The local mechanic said that 2/3 of his business is replacing those in the gas tank pumps, and the average cost is $600.
I have a 23 year old car with a carburetor and I've never replaced the mchanical fuel pump which is mounted on the engine block. If I needed to replace it, the pump costs $24, and takes a half hour or less to replace. (No gas tank removal).
At the same time, I have another vehicle, a newer pickup truck, with fuel injction, and an in tank electric pump, and I've replaced it 3 times in 4 years. In fact I finally cut an access panel (above th gas tank) in the truck bed, because I refused to drop the tank again. Each pump has cost around $120 just for the pump itself, and once the whole pump/float unit had to be replaced at a cost of $275.
They call this *PROGRESS*. I call it *GARBAGE*.
I'm just curious how many of you have had to replace yours? I think a class action lawsuit is in order against the manufacturers of the vehicles as well as the pump makers.
In the meantime, I'm looking for a manifold for my truck that will allow me to fit a carburetor in place of the fuel injection system, which by the way sucks more gas than the old carb engine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 03:31:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@america.com wrote:

Last fuel pump I recall replacing was on my '53 Mercury flathead back around 1964 or so.
Over the years, often had carb problems, never had an injection problem. BTW, if you change to a carburetor, you'll have to change the fuel pump too as it required different pressure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/11/2012 4:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@america.com wrote:

I give you a one on the troll-o-meter...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*I had to replace the fuel injection fuel pump once on my last truck (Dodge Ram Van). The mechanic told me it fried. They use a high speed pump and if it loses gas for a few seconds it burns out. At the time I was trying to see how far I could get on my 35 gallon gas tank and would go further and further between gas refills. With so little gas in the tank, any bump or pothole that you drive over is enough to cause the pump to lose fuel and burn out. Now I never let the fuel gauge go below a quarter tank.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the in gas tank pumps are cooled by the fuel in the tank
keep your tank mostly full will extend pump life.......
better to buy the expensive OEM pumps rather than the cheaper aftermarket ones, they dont last as long.....
aftermarket for my dodge caravan 160 bucks
OEM 500 bucks for just the pump:(
but labor to change them costs a fortune........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

s/cooled/lubricated/
"Mostly full" isn't needed but running it out will kill the pump. Running it low (<1/8 or so) will severely shorten its life.

Roger that. The hardware is by far the cheapest part of the job. Don't skimp on the cheap part.

Bingo.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And costs AT LEAST as much to install the aftermarket pump as the OEM - so it is often cheaper overall to install the good pump the FIRST time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/11/2012 5:05 AM, John Grabowski wrote:

Me and my friend LM dropped the 35gal tank on my Dodge van and the problem I was having was caused by the sock screen attached to the intake of the pump being folded over in such a way that a quarter coin sized piece of screen was all that was screening the intake. the small area would clog with debris and the engine would starve for fuel. I don't know if it is the original fuel pump or not but after removing it and reinstalling it properly, all I have to deal with now is poor quality alcohol laced gasoline and the inconsistent engine performance caused by such an abomination. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 11, 5:45am, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

35 gal tank on a van? I find that a bit odd. Even at 15 mpg it gives a cruise rand of 525 miles!
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/11/2012 11:23 AM, Harry K wrote:

It's an 89 model full sized V8 powered cavern on wheels. I think it's a 35 or 30 gallon tank but when we use a forklift to pick up that huge plastic tank, we thought it was a 50 gallon tank. The darn thing is huge! O_o
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 11, 1:51pm, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

Ah, that explains it. I was picturing the standard size soccer mom van.
My 89 F150 ate the main tank fuel pump right after I had filled it with $4 gas. Asked the mechanics to verify it was the pump, not wiring ...it was. Unfortunately the tank was near empty when I got it back. Since they didn't charge for the check I guess we came out about even.
I only use the truck for hauling firewood, low mileage use so just left it an run on the small tank.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 06:05:54 -0400, "John Grabowski"

And I've NEVER seen a fuel injected engine that uses more fuel for the same sized engine than a carbureted engine unless it also made significantly more power.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They call this *PROGRESS*. I call it *GARBAGE*.
I agree with you 100% and its not just the fuel pump either its everything. The progress is apparently in their profits, so they get to sell more vehicles instead of people getting away with repairing them. Last week I did something as simple as replacing my spark plugs, or so I thought. It was impossible to even unplug the cables without a special tool that costs about $50.00. If people would at least stop buying cars because of all their new fancy features and accessories the manufacturers might get the message. It looks like a jungle under the hood of the new cars.
On Thursday, October 11, 2012 1:32:28 AM UTC-7, (unknown) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 11, 8:17am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How much of that jungle under the hood and more difficult access do you think is due to "fancy features" as opposed to stricter emission standards, increasing MPG requirements, new safety standards, etc imposed by the govt? You can't squeeze 10 lbs of stuff into a 5 lb box without some consequences.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As usual, Congress is the man behind the curtain (Wizzard of Oz reference.) As usual, they pass laws and regulate, and we get upset at the wrong people.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
How much of that jungle under the hood and more difficult access do you think is due to "fancy features" as opposed to stricter emission standards, increasing MPG requirements, new safety standards, etc imposed by the govt? You can't squeeze 10 lbs of stuff into a 5 lb box without some consequences.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 05:39:37 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"
Re: Have you had to replace your fuel pump?:

vehicles instead of people getting away with repairing them. Last week I did something as simple as replacing my spark plugs, or so I thought. It was impossible to even unplug the cables without a special tool that costs about $50.00. If people would at least stop buying cars because of all their new fancy features and accessories the manufacturers might get the message. It looks like a jungle under the hood of the new cars.

98% of it
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes I agree with you completely as well.
On Thursday, October 11, 2012 5:39:37 AM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 05:17:49 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

vehicles instead of people getting away with repairing them. Last week I did something as simple as replacing my spark plugs, or so I thought. It was impossible to even unplug the cables without a special tool that costs about $50.00. If people would at least stop buying cars because of all their new fancy features and accessories the manufacturers might get the message. It looks like a jungle under the hood of the new cars.

It is definitely progress.
You don't need to change the plugs every 12000 miles any more - or adjust the carb and clean the choke, or rebuild the carb every 2 years. No more timing adjustments. No more points to burn, or even distributar caps and rotors to crack. A tuneup today is virtually a thing of the past.
Also, gone are the days of throwing a car away at under 100,000 miles because the engine is totally worn out. Accurate engine controls prevent overfueling from washing the oil off the cyls and wearing the rings out - and valve jobs are also virtually unheard of because, in large part, there is less engine deposits like carbon and lead building up, and the chances of running too lean under load causing a valve to burn are also greatly reduced.
Years ago there were service stations and garages on every other corner - and the service bays were busy most of the time. Today, with a whole lot more cars on the road, there are a lot fewer garages and service stations - and you can fire a cannon through most of them half the time without hitting anyone or anything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 11, 11:05pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'd like to know what specifically these folks think all these "fancy features" are that are taking up the space under the HOOD. Somehow I think they probably don't even work on cars or know what is there. In my experience, the vast majority of the tight space conditions under the hood of today's cars comes from:
A - Front wheel drive
B - Eqpt needed to meet EPA clean air reqts, eg charcoal canister for vapor recovery, oil traps for PCV, related hoses, various engine sensors and related wiring, air injection pumps, etc. You could maybe include catalytic converter too, but for the most part that is really after the engine compartment.
C - Need to reduce car dimensions to reduce weight for fuel economy while at the same time trying to maintain as much space in the cabin as possible. Add to that the need to streamline the shape of the front end, hood, etc for aerodynamics, something that no one gave a rat's ass about in 99% of the cars in the 70s.
I don't see much in the way of "fancy features" under the hood. About the only thing I can think of that is relatively new in that regard would be ABS breaking. AC takes up a good bit of space, but that has been around since the 60s and I think few would consider it a "fancy feature". Fancy features in the cabin? Yes. But I just don't see it in the engine compartment.
In fact some things have gone the other way. For example, I have a 1980 Mercedes classic car. It uses a grapefruit size vacuum actuator in the engine compartment with a long cable for the cruise control. With today's cars being computer controlled, that whole unit is no longer needed because the computer is already controlling the fuel.

Agree. A friend has a BMW with 140K miles on it and the original plugs. They should be changed by now, but so far no detectable impact on gas mileage or indications of any cylinder misfires. Also, today if even one of those spark plugs doesn't fire, the computer will set a code and turn on the check engine light.

How about rusting out? Remember the good old days when many cars went to the scrapper because the bodies were all rusted out? Today corrosion has been drastically reduced.

That part I'm not so sure about. All the complexity has added more things that can fail. And it has also gotten harder for the DIY guy to do many repairs. But all in all, it's a trade off that I thjnk we all agree is a good thing. I sure wouldn't want say a Dodge from the 1970s compared to what you get today.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/12/2012 9:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:
...

I think he's pretty accurate from observation here...the dealer shops here _are_ pretty much deserted these days around here. There are a couple of independents that are busy it seems, but much of what they do is the routine stuff like brakes, etc., that doesn't require all the diagnostic equipment and/or specialty tools the dealer garage must have for the complex stuff...
I had a front hub start howling on the old LeSabre (approaching 200k; that would have been almost unheard of 30 yr ago) and wasn't able w/ my old ears to isolate where the noise was actually coming from. Just drove in to the shop unannounced and a mechanic came and took a ride and pulled it into a bay when we came back and was done by evening. Even 15 yr ago that would have required an appointment for sometime the next week at best, probably.
In addition, there are multiple empty bays in the shop w/ no mechanics filling the slots that used to be all occupied. That's so for all three manufacturers' shops here--Ford, GM, Chrysler so it's not just a single dealership slipping thing; I think it is reflective that mechanicals are just better than used to be. Now, that gets made up for in some regards by it's a heckuva lot more expensive per repair in general I think... :( --but, overall, I agree I think it's a win.
I know the big farm work trucks are _much_ more reliable and require far less routine maintenance than before. Used to be we'd have to stop and change oil at least once if not twice during harvest because service intervals were so short--now they go thru the entire season on one.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.