Have you ever used this funky style 2" PVC sliding pipe connection

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I'm cutting out a leaking ion-exchange unit at the pool equipment.
The local hardware store talked me into this funky repair pipe:
Have you ever used one of these funky things before?
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Don't let any of the dilithium crystals spill out.....

No, and have no idea what it is, what it's purpose is, etc.
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On Sun, 16 Jun 2013 15:57:59 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

:)

It's some kind of funky fancy no-fuss "slider" pipe. :)
I'm inclined to put the schedule 80 compression fitting in there (the store didn't have any schedule 40 compression fittings), but the pipe is so low to the ground, I might not have enough room.
That ion-exchange thing is a PITA - I can't even figure out how to disconnect it - so I'm going brute force sawit out. :(

Why do they put these things in there anyway?
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WTF is a Sched 80 or 40 "compression fitting"?
And what's wrong with normal PVC fittings that make them unsuitable?
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On 6/16/13 7:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

One of these, for example: http://tinyurl.com/kc3ly9u

an underground plastic pipe.
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On Sun, 16 Jun 2013 17:51:56 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Dean Hoffman showed a picture of the compression fittin: http://tinyurl.com/kc3ly9u
But, I was mistaken by calling my fitting that; mine was a schedule 80 union.


Nothing. I just like being able to take things apart, if needed:

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So, it's like a Sharkbite. I didn't know they made them as large as 2".

And of course a "union" is a normal PVC fitting and you're not using a compression fitting. I'll bet those 2" compression fittings cost a fortune. I'm having a hard time imagining the need to use one, versus say doing a repair using two 50cent repair couplings and a piece of PVC pipe.
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wrote:

Normal repair couiplings require at least one of the two ends be movable back and forth. A compression one can be fitted if all you can do is move one of the pipes sideways.
Harry K
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No, a repair coupling does not require that one of the pipes move sideways. To replace a section of pipe with a hole, you cut out that section. You cut a new piece of pipe about 1/4" shorter. You prime, put on glue. On the existing pipe you only apply glue to the usual length. On the new piece of pipe you apply primer/glue along enough of it so that the repair couplings can be slid ALL THE WAY ON. Put pipe in place, slide couplings half way back so that they are now over the old pipe.
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On Mon, 17 Jun 2013 07:22:22 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I need to repair this hole, which was plugged by whomever removed the automatic chlorine feeder; but it sometimes leaks:

I don't understand how it can be done, even after reading your description. The 1/4 inch won't be enough.
I think you're saying to fix this, I can: 1. Cut out on both sides of the hole 2. Primer & cement on a coupling on both sides 3. Measure the pipe to fit between the couplings (going 1.5 inches in both sides. 4. Subtract (you say 1/4 but I think it's 1.5 inches) from that measurement 5. Put primer & cement on both ends of the new pipe 6. Shove the pipe all the way (1.5 inches) on one side 7. That just lets you get the pipe to touch the other side 8. Then center the pipe 3/4 inches on both sides
That's the only way I see that it can be done, and, even this method has a problem that you can't shove the pipe straight in on the first side.
So I must be missing something on how to repair a section without a union.
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Let's say you have 3 ft of pipe with one 6" section near the middle that's bad. You cut out the 6" piece. You cut a new piece about 1/4" shorter. Now it will fit easily where the bad piece was. You prime/glue all 4 ends of the pipes and the two repair couplings. You slide the repair couplings ALL THE WAY ONTO THE 5 3/4" repair pipe. Now what you have is still 5 3/4" in length. You position the repair pipe with the couplings where it goes, then slide the two couplings into place over the ends of the existing pipe.
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On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 00:48:04 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Thanks for being patient with the explanation.
I understand the key point, which is you make a temporary double-ended "slider" out of the repair 5-3/4pipe, where it fits inside the 6" opening, and then, while the glue is still wet, you slide the still-wet couplings (before they have set) out to meet the old pipe on both ends.
This is ingenious!
The only problem I have is with the math on the initial length of the 5-3/4 inch repair pipe - but that's a minor concern as the idea is what matters.
(I'll take up the length clarification separately.)
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On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 00:48:04 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Thanks for being patient with the explanation.
I understand the key point, which is you make a temporary double-ended "slider" out of the repair 5-3/4pipe, where it fits inside the 6" opening, and then, while the glue is still wet, you slide the still-wet couplings (before they have set) out to meet the old pipe on both ends.
This is ingenious!
The only problem I have is with the math on the initial length of the 5-3/4 inch repair pipe - but that's a minor concern as the idea is what matters.
(I'll take up the length clarification separately.)
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On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 00:48:04 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Thanks for being patient with the explanation.
I understand the key point, which is you make a temporary double-ended "slider" out of the repair 5-3/4pipe, where it fits inside the 6" opening, and then, while the glue is still wet, you slide the still-wet couplings (before they have set) out to meet the old pipe on both ends.
This is ingenious!
The only problem I have is with the math on the initial length of the 5-3/4 inch repair pipe - but that's a minor concern as the idea is what matters.
(I'll take up the length clarification separately.)
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On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:42:31 +0000, Danny D wrote:

Drat. Every once in a while, my newsreader hangs and sends the same message out 3 times! Sorry about that.
I'm sending this via a different news server.
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On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 00:48:04 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I love the procedure; I just have a problem with the math, and, since I plan on trying it out, the math matters.
The problem I have is that the coupling seems to have an internal stop at about 1-1/4 inches inward as shown in this photo:

Given that, the repair pipe is extended by the remaining amount on both sides, which is about 1-1/2 inches on each side including the stop itself and a bit of slop (for a total of 3 inches of length extension).
So, given a six-inch opening, if I subtract those extra 3 inches, that would make a repair pipe of about 3 inches.
If I then subtract the 1/4 inch from those 3 inches, I get the following dimensions & procedure for the repair pipe:
1. Cut a 2-3/4" repair pipe 2. The total length including the two couplings would be: 2-3/4" pipe + 1-1/2" coupling + 1-1/2" coupling = 5-3/4" 3. That should easily fit in the 6-inch opening.
a. Prime everything & put glue on everything b. Place the couplings on the pipe ends (all the way) c. Insert the pipe in the opening, and slide the couplings outward
This math, if I work fast, should fix this hole, if I cut out six inches of pipe. Right?

PS: I changed my newsserver because aioe is posting in triplicate.
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I suggest you try a 'dry run' of fitting two couplings to a repair section, glueing up both ends and then try putting a sub of pipe on each end. First one will go but if you delay more than a second or two the other one won't got, glue will have set too much already. At least with all the glues I have used. Trying that procedure in the bottom of a hole isn't going to work.
Harry K
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On Wed, 19 Jun 2013 08:19:34 -0700, Harry K wrote:

That's a good idea!
The PVC "cement" is so very fast, that there are only seconds to spare before it "sets".
I'd guess I have about 10 seconds, maybe even fewer.
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On Wed, 19 Jun 2013 09:44:56 -0700, Oren wrote:

Hi Oren,
That's an interesting suggestion. You're always helpful, and I appreciate that.
Googling, I see this slow set "216 PVC Cement" sets in hours: http://www.e-zweld.com/products/product_detail.aspx?id=MTA0MQ = It seems that the "gray" cement is the slow setting stuff: http://www.pexsupply.com/Hercules-60215-1-pt-Heavy-Body-Slow-Set-PVC-Cement-Gray
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On Wed, 19 Jun 2013 10:28:08 -0700, Oren wrote:

Interestingly, I could have used that thicker cement when doing my oversized couplings over the existing Jandy valves. "This cement is ideal for joining large diameter PVC pipes & fittings where the gap between pipes and fittings is large."
The "cure time" is roughly about 2 hours (give or take); but I wonder what the "setting time" is, as that is more important than the final strength.
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