Have you ever made a snake catching tool (for home use)?

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wrote:

You must be a rat fan.
Arizona was pretty effective in killing all the rattlesnakes, then they were over run with rats that were decimating their signature cactus.
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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 08:25:44 -0700, Roy wrote:

If I successfully relocate a poisonous snake, he's just as good as "dead" to me, as he won't harm me or anyone else after I put him in the ravine.
He's as much a part of the ecosystem as I am. I walk in that ravine all the time; I just don't want him around the kids in the yard (although I hope something gets that pesky gopher, which, I might add, is apparently immune to pool chemicals poured down his holes!).
Besides, killing a single snake, statistically, will have zero effect overall on the snake population (likewise as saving that one snake of course).
However, I'm still studying whether a relocated snake will return to the original location, even if his relocation site is suitable (as I believe mine is).
Here's a specific study on rattlesnake-relocation efficacy: http://www.dlblanc.com/coloherp/cb-news/Vol-28/cbn-0109/Relocation.html
Their results are a bit confusing because, in one sentence they advocate short-distance relocation (<1 mile) while they deprecate long-distance relocation (>5 miles); yet, in another part of the study, they state that even shorter-distance relocation (<500 yards) may not be 100% effective, particularly for male rattlers as a few did return (particularly to really good feeding sites).
I'll keep learning how best to relocate rattlers so that they survive, and, yet, don't return to the house where kids play.
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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 13:23:57 -0700, Oren wrote:

Plus, it adds to the population of varmint who would otherwise be dinner for the poisonous snakes ...
Nonetheless, these snakes don't seem to be endangered, at least not here in California ...
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On Tue, 04 Jun 2013 05:47:47 -0700, Robert Macy wrote:

There is a ton of misinformation out there, and, this one appears to be incorrect (just as the baby-rattlers-are-more-dangerous myth is).
I read the articles on relocation, where they inserted tracking devices in adult rattlers, and most survived. I also read articles where they tracked baby rattlers, and even more survived, than did the adults.
What the tracking articles said was that the older a rattler gets, the more it seeks out the same type of den as it was in before. They wander about until they find just such a den. This wandering exposes them to dangers, so you want to minimize their wanderlust. The experts suggest we move them to a familiar style of location, where they can find a den sooner than if we move them to a non-familiar style of location.
When I spoke by phone to a number of rattler relocation experts, they all told me that a few hundred yards should be far enough that the rattler wouldn't likely return.
In fact, one even featured "my" young rattler in his blog post! http://www.livingalongsidewildlife.com/
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Dude, you have a *rattlesnake* in your yard. This is the appropriate tool for disposing of it:
http://remington.com/en/product-families/firearms/shotgun-families/autoloading-model- 1100.aspx
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I usually draft a long handled shovel into service. Another time a 5 gallon plastic paint bucket with about 20 pounds of rock in it. Set the bucket on the rattler, until I could go get my shovel to lop off its head. So far - a four foot FAT rattler, a little 3 foot rattler, and a four foot really nasty venomous 'green' m?? rattler. By the way, rattler venom STINKS! Actually almost put a hole in my plastic bucket. Feel really bad about removing such great predators, but they're territorial and stay close by and I hate the possibillity of stepping on one at night, OUCH! and they're fast.
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