Hauling With A Chain

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I want to use a chain to haul a fallen tree out of the marshy area up to so lid ground where I can saw it up. I have a long chain but it doesn't have c hain hooks on the ends. Will it hold if I wrap it around the trunk a few ti mes then do a double knot with it? It seems like the links of the chain sho uld grab onto each other as the pulling starts and keep it from slipping.
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solid ground where I can saw it up. I have a long chain but it doesn't have chain hooks on the ends. Will it hold if I wrap it around the trunk a few times then do a double knot with it? It seems like the links of the chain s hould grab onto each other as the pulling starts and keep it from slipping.
It would seem to me that a hook is only one way of securing a chain. Another could be a bolt, washers and a nut.
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Padlock. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
It would seem to me that a hook is only one way of securing a chain. Another could be a bolt, washers and a nut.
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wrote:

o solid ground where I can saw it up. I have a long chain but it doesn't ha ve chain hooks on the ends. Will it hold if I wrap it around the trunk a fe w times then do a double knot with it? It seems like the links of the chain should grab onto each other as the pulling starts and keep it from slippin g.

Or spend a few bucks for one of those 'add a link' where one leg of the link scews open, or one that slips on then gets pound flat, etc. A few moments in the 'chain' area of any hardware store will give a lot of easy solutions.
Harry K
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On 4/1/2013 4:22 PM, Pavel314 wrote:

ground where I can saw it up. I have a long chain but it doesn't have chain hooks on the ends. Will it hold if I wrap it around the trunk a few times then do a double knot with it? It seems like the links of the chain should grab onto each other as the pulling starts and keep it from slipping.

Use a bolt and nut to secure the chain.
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solid ground where I can saw it up. I have a long chain but it doesn't have chain hooks on the ends. Will it hold if I wrap it around the trunk a few times then do a double knot with it? It seems like the links of the chain should grab onto each other as the pulling starts and keep it from slipping.

x3 on the nut and bolt. There is a very good chance that a knot will bind and never come apart. If I thought I would ever use this chain for hauling anything again I would get a couple "clevis" grab hooks and make a real tow chain out of it.
http://tinyurl.com/c7nek38
Match the hook size to the chain size. You can usually do better than Grainger on price.
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<...snipped...>

A sling hook rather than a grab hook would be better for the end that goes around the log.
http://www.gunnebojohnson.com/grabiq-advanced-chain-and-sling-systems/hooks/sling-hooks/egkn-sling-hook/
Allows the chain loop to tighten around the log.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry W. - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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On Mon, 1 Apr 2013 21:40:47 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

+1-- Grab hook on the 'tractor' end-- slip hook on the log. That allows you to shorten up the chain if need be.
BTDT
Jim
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On Apr 1, 2:40 pm, snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

The standard method is "sling" on one end, "grab" on the other.
Harry K
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I had a nylon rope bind, one time. I let someone else tie, and he didn't know how to do a bowline. Lost a foot or so off my good tow rope, due to his inexperience. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
There is a very good chance that a knot will bind and never come apart.
If I thought I would ever use this chain for hauling anything again I would get a couple "clevis" grab hooks and make a real tow chain out of it.
http://tinyurl.com/c7nek38
Match the hook size to the chain size. You can usually do better than Grainger on price.
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You can add a chain hook (or two) with a special link called a clevis, sold at hardware or auto parts stores for about $5.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On Mon, 1 Apr 2013 17:57:22 -0400, "Don Phillipson"

Or you can by a "repair link" that screws together.
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I think if I were to do this with the chain alone, I'd use a Timber hitch, or the closely relater Killick hitch. Note that I've never tried either in chain.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber_hitch
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killick_hitch
As others have said, probably your best bet is a the biggest diameter bolt that'll go through your chain links.
Be careful... good luck!
Erik
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No, the best bet is to use a clevis, repair link, etc that is DESIGNED to take the load. I cut firewood and have over 400 ft of various chains, cables, tow straps, etc. and I gaurantee you I would never use a bolt for that purpose. The right thing is available for not much money in any hardware store in the chain section.
Harry K
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On 4/1/2013 4:22 PM, Pavel314 wrote:

ground where I can saw it up. I have a long chain but it doesn't have chain hooks on the ends. Will it hold if I wrap it around the trunk a few times then do a double knot with it? It seems like the links of the chain should grab onto each other as the pulling starts and keep it from slipping.

I've done it a couple of times when I had a firewood business. If tightly wrapped around the tree, the chain will bite into the bark and hopefully you have some wider trunk area before the chain wrap so the chain can't slip off. The only downside is if the branches are hung up on other trees etc.
However take the advice of many people in this thread: Find a way to get a temporary hook on that chain. In the long run, it's safer and easier.
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On Monday, April 1, 2013 8:40:01 PM UTC-4, Hench wrote:

o solid ground where I can saw it up. I have a long chain but it doesn't ha ve chain hooks on the ends. Will it hold if I wrap it around the trunk a fe w times then do a double knot with it? It seems like the links of the chain should grab onto each other as the pulling starts and keep it from slippin g.


er.
Thanks to everyone for their suggestions. I'd forgotten about the possibili ty of the chain getting permanently stuck from knotting. Years ago I found an old chain in the barn which had a big tangled knot on the end. I guess s omeone else didn't have a hook handy many years ago. I managed to get it un stuck with a hammer and channel locks. Not that I needed the chain for anyt hing at the time, it was just a big metal puzzle.
I picked up two chain hooks with clevis pins at Home Depot this evening for about $5 each. They're rated at about two tons so they should do the job.
Paul
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wrote:

of the chain getting permanently stuck from knotting. Years ago I found an old chain in the barn which had a big tangled knot on the end. I guess someone else didn't have a hook handy many years ago. I managed to get it unstuck with a hammer and channel locks. Not that I needed the chain for anything at the time, it was just a big metal puzzle.

You are going to be happy you went that way. A chain like that will be handy for dragging all sorts of things around.
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And a chain wrapped around something and hooked to itself puts half the full load on the hook. Almost always better than a straight hook connection
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of the chain getting permanently stuck from knotting. Years ago I found an old chain in the barn which had a big tangled knot on the end. I guess someone else didn't have a hook handy many years ago. I managed to get it unstuck with a hammer and channel locks. Not that I needed the chain for anything at the time, it was just a big metal puzzle.

Wrapping the chain and hooking the chain to itself is still better than the knot - and you don't need anywhere to "place the hook" without damage. If you can do it with a knot, you CAN do it with a proper hook. Different hook to grab a link than to "cinch" with a chain.
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I bought a used Ford Ranger pickup. Came with some wood scraps in the back. The guy suggested I just drive out back and throw the wood in the burn pile. It was a bit wet, but he says we can always pull you out with the tractor. I drove out, but it wasn't one of my better judgement calls. I came walking back, with wet feet.
So, the seller fired up the tractor, and went after the Ford. Got the tractor stuck up to its axle in mud, too. He tried various things under the wheels, none helped much.
He had an old Jeep, a really old one. Enclosed cab model, with a bit of enclosed space in the back. A bit like a Chevy Suburban. Used that to pull the tractor, and my truck out.
This all took several days, in which time I wasn't driving my "new to me" truck. I should have just carried the scrap out back. Or, dump the scrap on the driveway and lethim put it on the burn pile.
And, also, thanks for the memory. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
No doubt and I agree with using hooks on the chain.
Still a knot works when necessary. We were almost knee deep in mud one day in a swamp. A flatbed '67 Chevy truck. STUCK!
My brother stuck a 1/4 - 1/3 stick of dynamite under the rear axle, certain it would help (long story). WRONG.
The truck lifted and dropped into the Everglades muck. What a hole that axle dropped into. Tires in deep. Axle under the mud.
Two more trucks, chains with and without hooks finally pulled the ole Chevy out. It took some knots to do it.
Not to mention two days me and my bride spent stuck another time (I was AWOL from work)
Thanks for the memory.
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