Has anyone Tried to Recycle heat from Dryer vent?

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My electric dryer just blows against the cellar wall, so it's all recycled energy except what sticks to the wall, which isn't a large proportion. In fact I don't understand blowing it outside at all.
Of course I don't perfume the laundry. You can stink up an entire neighborhood with dryer sheets so I can't imagine what it would be like if confined indoors.
--
Ron Hardin
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com
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drying
a
this,
My mother did it when I was younger. I would too if I knew how to do it safely.
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"lbbs" <nonex> wrote in message

drying
a
this,
One apartment I lived in had almost no insulation on the exterior walls. The heating system was OK, but just couldn't keep up in winter, fighting against all the cold that bled through the walls. We bought a lint filter for the electric dryer for about $10. Basically, it's a bucket of water. There is a cover on the bucket of water with several holes in it. One HUGE hole is where you attatch the end of the dryer hose. Air from the dryer hits the water in the bucket, where lint is trapped. Then the warm air with lint removed exits the smaller holes in the side of the bucket cap. It will raise the temperature of a ~1000 square foot apartment 2 - 4 degrees F, while the dryer is running. It will also raise the humidity level to about 60% or so. It's not very effective, and overall not a good idea. At BEST, the effect it has wears off in an hour or two after the clothes are dry. You'd have to do about 70 loads of laundry a week in a small apartment to notice any effect on your heating bill. :) -Dave
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Dave C. wrote:

It has no effect on your heating bill, at least if you heat electrically and it's an electric dryer. You get to run the dryer free though where if you vent it outdoors it costs you to run it.
--
Ron Hardin
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We have a condenser dryer, where there is no outside vent...the water all goes into a reservoir, which we empty after each use. So the heat does stay in the room, which is our laundry room/pantry. No problems for us, not even damp on the walls.
--
It's Tis Herself

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First this is not for gas dryers.
Second, be ready for increased dust in your home.
Personally I believe it is a bad idea. Have you even seen the stuff in a vent pipe, even with a filter on it.
Be sure to vent to the home in general. Venting to the same room will drive up the humidity in that room making the dryer less efficient.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I have done this for installation where there was no place to run the vent outside.. I purchased a special ventless dryer lint trap from an appliance store..
Just putting a filter or screen on the end didn't work because it filled up too fast and was clumsy to clean.. The commercial unit had a easy way to clean the trap.. The moist air and heat stayed in the laundry room and the windows would steam up.. The drying time was about 10% longer..
Steve
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Home Depot sells a hot air diverter that allows you to route the hot air in or outside. It sells for ~$10 Canadian and is easy to install. It works very well with my electric dryer. I place a piece of old nylon stocking over the exhaust screen to filter fine lint. As the winters in my area tend to be cold and dry, the additional heat and humidity is welcome and I no longer need to run my furnace humidifier. I typically minimize the amount of detergent and fabric softener used, so the exhaust air smells clean but not overpowering.
I would recommended you thoroughly clean the dryer vent hose at least 1-2 times per year. If you decide to use a home made nylon filter like i do, remove and clean the nylon with a lint brush between loads and ensure you do not overdry your laundry. Also monitor your house humidity and route the exhaust air outside if the house becomes too humid to prevent moisture damage. I tend to space out my laundry throughout the week, completing 2-3 loads at a time, to ensure a steady output of humidity.
Hope this helps,
Marty Edmonton Alberta Canada
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vent
appliance
up
the
As a fellow Edmontonian, let me point out that NO diversion...except to the outdoors, should be made to the exhaust was a clothes dryer using natural gas or propane as a fuel.
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Marty wrote: <snip>

<snip>
Thanks, Marty. I've been waiting for someone to post where to get one of those. In the winter we keep a pot of water on the stove to keep the humidity up. Your solution will really help.
Albert
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Get one while you can....mechanical code prohibits the use of these in most areas that follow the IBC, and many stores here no longer carry them. Thankfully...
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Cheaper to simply not drain the bathtub until next time the tub is needed. Surface area of water in tub is much greater than pot on stove.

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lbbs wrote:

My (electric) dryer was in my kitchen and in winter I never opened the window to let it vent. The filter was very fine-meshed and there was no dust or lint on any surfaces. The washing was always run through a separate spinner, so it wasn't all that wet. The extra humidity wasn't really a problem; only the window ever showed any condensation and that disappeared in a few minutes after the dryer finished.
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in article snipped-for-privacy@ic.ac.uk, Arri London at snipped-for-privacy@ic.ac.uk wrote on 1/6/04 7:05 PM:

In climates where the winter is cold and dry (like MN & WI) having the extra humidity and heat inside is a boon, but you want to be able to switch it back to venting outside in summer, 'cause then the heat and humidity are a drag. Also want to monitor the humidity-get a humidistat. They're pretty cheap. You don't want the humidity to get over 50% if you can help it. That can do damage to your house, as well as encouraging dust mites and mold.
I've seen indoor dryer vent attachments in Home Trends (a catalog). I think they have a website.
Chris OE snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
--



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"Dave, Chris & Ben Oinonen Ehren" wrote:

That wasn't really a problem in London. Outside humidity can easily be 50 percent or more on a regular basis. As for dust mites and moulds, keeping the house clean really does minimise those problems. LOL not to mention my flat was in a 260+-year old church. Any wood was buried within metre-thick walls of stone and later concrete. The floors were also concrete about 2 foot thick. Mould was never an issue.

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Shaarx wrote:

LOL With great difficulty. Having been bombed during WW2 helped a lot. During reconstruction, it was easier in the parts of the church that were damaged, but the walls were put back to their original thickenss.
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drying
a
this,
Lot of problems.
Lint, and lots of it. Uncontrolled humidity release If you have a gas dryer, CO release into the home. And its against all codes now. There IS a reason for that.
As someone else suggested, if you are that worried about saving a buck, get a heat recovery unit for your central air system, and have it installed.
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drying
a
this,
Ya, I did . . . first I used one of those plastic box things that you flip a lever and air is vented either outside or through a wire screen fliter. Then I just disconnected the exhaust hose and used a rubber band to hold a large pillowcase over the end, and ya, that worked better. Usually in winter, indoor humidity levels get pretty low, so I don't think there will be much problem with extra drying time. I didn't have any problem. All ya gotta do is turn the pillowcase inside out once a month and run it through the washer, and you'll be golden . . . --Tock
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Storm windows can greatly alleviate humidity loss.
I make mine on a frame of 5/8 inch unfinished bolding stock, mitred, glued, and stapled at the corners. Then 3 mil acetate sheet is stretched over the frame and stapled down. Finally, foam weather stripping is attached around the frame's perimeter, to make a tight seal against the window casing. -- -john
~~~~~~~~ Always listen to experts. They will explain what can't be done and why. Then do it. - Robert Heinlein ~~~~~~~~
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