Has anyone Tried to Recycle heat from Dryer vent?

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I imagine putting some find of a filter at the end of the vent house would do the trick, and direct the vent into the laundry room. Some one mentioned that the added humidity in the room might actually make the drying process take longer (it need dry air). Although in my case might not be a problem because the room is very large (24x24). Anyone ever tried this, did it work good, any problems? Thanks
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drying
a
this,
I haven't tried it yet, but I keep eyeing a similar redirection. The oil tank for my home heating is above ground, very near where the dryer vent exits. On extreme cold days (teens, single digits), water in the tank will occasionally freeze up and block the fuel feed. I've been toying with the idea of extending the vent to encase the tank feed. Hmmm.
Joe F.
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Go to the nearest gas station and pick up a couple bottles of gasline antifreeze and dump them in your oil tank. It's an alcohol that mixes with the water and prevents it from freezing. Your furnace can burn it just fine. Do it whenever you get the tank filled.
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Actually..no.. Alcohol absorbs water..and no, the furnace cant burn it just fine. IF he was going to do this, and not simply use the tanks water drain plug he would use a diesel mix....
BUT.....
Unless the furnace is stuttering, or tripping the control box for the CAD, there isnt any water in the tank to worry about. The filter assembly will separate the water, and trap it, and depending on his temps, its not water freezing in the lines, but the fuel is waxing.
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will
It's probably not water in the fuel. All heating oil contains paraffin (wax) dissolved in it. When the oil get cold, the wax freezes out, blocking the fuel feed.
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Heating oil (and diesel) _is_ essentially "paraffin wax" - it's just that it's (supposed to be) above its melting point.
In more extreme climates, you have to pay attention, because normal "summer weight" fuel oils and diesels can freeze at 10-15F. With a result that looks very much like candle wax. Normal winter weight is usually more like -35F, but in some cases you need it even lower than that.
I used to work in a refinery lab, and one of the tests we routinely did was check freeze points on fuel oils and diesel fuels.
The OP may wish to consider discussing with his fuel oil supplier what he's getting. They should be able to give him the exact specifications. He may have to pay attention to what the supplier is providing in any particular season, and judging whether he'll be using the summer weight stuff up before it gets that cold. Then again, a good supplier should be taking his usage patterns into consideration when he fills the tank, and not "pushing" summer weight into the winter.
If the problem recurs this winter, a top up of winter-weight may solve the problem.
Extending the vent (and/or tenting it with plastic, say) may be a good solution until you get the situation settled.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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You should be using kerosene or a mixture of fuel oil and kerosene for an outside tank to prevent fuel gelling/waxing. We use straight fuel oil up until the beginning of January and then a mix of the fuel oil/kero until the end of Feb. Never had a problem that way.
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My bro-in-law does that. But we live in New Mexico where excessive humidity is far from being a problem. It does add humidity to the room but in this climate it's a blessing. Our average humidity is 30% with days dropping to single digits.
The drying time doesn't seem to be a problem at all.
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We bought a cheap unit at Home Depot that filtered out the link and allowed the warm air to circulate through the house. But it also circulates a lot of humidity. We took it off and wouldn't recommend it.
wrote:

would
be
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drying
a
this,
I don't remember exactly where, but I do remember seeing a pipe/hose contraption that connected to the dryer's outlet and then to the vent to the outside and had a little slider that allowed you to open and close it. When closed, the dryer's exhaust went through the thing to the outside and when open it simply vented it into the room. The handy part was that it was tall so that the open/closing thing was above the height of the dryer so it was easy to use.
Probably google-able.
trebor
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Dumping uncontrolled humidity and lint-filled air into a home is a bad idea. If you do, I hope the dryer is electric! -- Best Regards, Dennis J Sunday Home Inspection Systems Www.homeinspectionsystems.com

drying
a
this,
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First of all, you can't do this safely if you have a gas dryer, because the carbon monoxide fumes from the gas combustion are vented along with the hot air.
Second, I doubt the extra humidity in the room would be an issue, because humidity is usually much lower in the winter when you would want to reclaim heat from the dryer.
Third, there are products on the market which do what you want. See, e.g.:
http://shop.store.yahoo.com/energysuperstore/clotdryerhea.html http://www.cetsolar.com/extraheat.htm http://www.usahardware.com/inet/shop/item/83560/icn/20-189241/deflecto/ex12.htm http://www.audio-etcetera.com/prod.itml/icOid/107528
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Hi Jon,
It depends on the circumstances.
Left for work with firm instructions to the SO to "leave the laundry door open when you run the dryer!".
Half way thru the day, she called me in a panic because all the wallpaper in the laundry room was sliding off the walls.
She forgot to keep the door open.
She remembers now ;-)
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Jonathan Kamens wrote:

Hope this isn't a dumb question - bear with me if it is. I'm just puzzled is all, and a real mechanical dweeb when it comes to stuff like this.
I have both a gas clothes dryer and a gas stove ... (also gas furnace and gas water heater), but here's the question ... if there are dangerous carbon monoxide fumes that are released from a gas dryer due to gas combustion, how come I don't have that problem when I use the gas stove and gas oven? Or do I? Am I supposed to be venting the fumes from my gas stove elements to the outside someplace? If so, nobody ever told me that - it's been over 8 years without a problem. I *do* have the gas dryer vented to outside, and the furnace as well - just not the stove or the water heater.
thanks for any explanation offered.
ing
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Don't know about gas stoves BUT not having a water heater vented?? I thought even the super efficient ones (gas powered) were vented.

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I've never heard of one that wasn't. The high efficiency types often have plastic pipe vents sticking out a wall, and may not appear to be vented to those who're not familiar with the new units.
Gas stoves/ovens don't need to be vented nearly as much as furnaces or water heaters simply because they don't burn nearly as much gas to operate. Secondly, furnaces and water heaters tend to be more enclosed, leading to more likely "pooling" of CO.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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On 7 Jan 2004 04:02:44 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

"pooling"? I thougt it had to do with too much recycling of the combustion makeup air.
-- -john
~~~~~~~~ Always listen to experts. They will explain what can't be done and why. Then do it. - Robert Heinlein ~~~~~~~~
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The local Home Improvement center might have the diverter/filter you need. I'd only do this with an electric dryer though.
It's a plastic box you connect in the hose, with a flap and a handle to choose where to divert the exhaust to - inside or outside.
The "inside" outlet connects to another hose which dumps the warm moist air into a little container which has a fine lint filter and water on the bottom. Microscopic lint is trapped when it hits the water, and the warm moist air skims across the top of the water and out while passing through yet another nylon-stocking type filter.
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drying
a
this,
Years ago I just let the dryer (electric) vent into the room since there was no way to install a vent pipe. Right away I found that a filter (nylon stocking) was needed to help control the lint and dust; but the humidity was not a problem. The outside temperature, house construction and number of loads would, of course, make a difference. It's not a good idea to load your walls up with moisture if you have many below-freezing days ahead.
Some catalogs that advertise houshold help gadgets used to show a damper device that could be set to blow the dryer output back into the room and, as I recall, it had a built-in filter. Maybe those are still around.
TKM
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Our compressor coil for the heat pump sits outside near the dryer vent. Every few months I have to clean the fins on the side near the vent. No way would I vent dryer air into a living space, unless it was super-filtered. With a basic filter, the dust increase would be large, and the lung associations have regularly shown that tiny particles of chemicals can be very damaging to the lungs. Breathing in detergent and fabric softener isn't my cuppa tea.
A heat exchanger that would warm the incoming replacement air makes more sense to me. For every cubic foot of air the dryer exhausts to the outside, it pulls in a cubic foot of cold outside air - or in our case in south Florida, hot humid outside air.
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