Has anyone taken apart an Electric Water Heater?


I had to replace my 30 years old elec. water heater and need to dispose of it. The recycling center takes metal scrap for free but charges for full water heaters.
I'd like to cut up the old water heater into small sections for metal recycling. My biggest question it what's the main storage tank made of. Is it steel? If it's glass lined does this cause any problems in cutting it up?
Does a sawsall work OK or would a cutting torch work better. I'm just not sure what to expect once I peel off the steel shell.
TIA
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Tin on the outside with a wrap of fiber glass insulation. To cut the tank a torch will work fine or a skill saw with a metal cutting blade will work also (gloves face shield and long sleeves)
--
Roger Shoaf
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On 22 Mar 2007 10:39:59 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I wish I had thought of that.
I took off the top of my electric water heater, and it didn't look easy to take apart, so I and a 140 pound woman continued to struggle to get it up the stairs.
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-snip-

Sawsall with the right blade-- But even if you have a sawsall, it's cheaper to use a $5 plywood blade in a skilsaw. It starts slow- but once it gets going it melts its way through. I've used the same $5 blade to chop up two 275gallon oil barrels and 3 hot water tanks so far-- since it is 'cutting' mostly by friction heat it seems like the smoother it gets the faster it cuts.
!!!Be sure to use eye and respiratory protection!!!!
Jim
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-snip-

The world is a very big place- but outside of museums I haven't seen a copper water heater.
Where have you seen a copper [or even copper lined] one. Had to be pre 1920's at least, wasn't it?
Jim
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Will you go to Bud's and pick up his WH for him?
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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I have 3 thoughts: Is this to: 1) Remove it from your house? 2) To get a the elements in it to fix it or 3) For cleaning it out? Also, is it Gas or Electric? I just recently did some work (home owner knowledge only) and it was less than a 10 minute job to replace the heating elements (both top and bottom) and about $45.00 in parts. One of the simplist jobs I ever had to do. All that was required was to turn off the electric, turn off the water, open the pressure valve, start to drain the tank, and then get a BIG cressant wrench to take out the elements. You will need a screwdriver too, to remove the wires attached to those elements. Then just reverse the operation. Don't pay an electrician to do this simple job!!! Michael at Aspenologies :D
--
Aspenologies
Message Origin: TRAVEL.com
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Aspenologies wrote:

I've changed a lot of electric water heater elements without draining the heater. Of course I turn everything off and relieve the pressure but if you're quick enough, you can remove and replace the element with very little water splashing out of the hole. It's even better if you have a helper to hold a pan or small bucket to catch any water. Hint, close the T/P valve first and any open hot water faucets.
TDD
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