Hardwood not hard, softwood not soft! (necessarily)

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I agree. Never paid much attention to this in the past as how they were grouped, only as to the values the 'shared'. But they are indeed different trees, my error. Sorry to all and esp. Larry.
Dennis
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Don't know... I sort of miss him in a strange kind of way......
S.

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I was looking through the Structures and Environment Handbook on this. It was covered in section 201 as follows:
"Hardwoods and softwoods. All native species are divided into two classes- hardwoods and softwoods. In general, hardwoods have broad leaves and are deciduous (shed their leaves each season). Softwoods are conifers and have scalelike leaves as in cedars or needlelike leaves as in pines. "Hardwood" and "softwood" do not describe the wood's hardness or softness."
Beyond this, I've never seen any tables covering a wood's sawability (difficulty to saw as an indication of "hardness".) If any measure could be applied, I would guess it would be related to either a wood's elastic modulus or compression perpendicular to grain. (There would have to be some common frame of reference which is common to both hardwoods and softwoods.)
You should be able to find values for most all hardwoods and softwoods in the "Wood Handbook" by the Forest Products Laboratory, Forest Service of US Dept of Agriculture. (Handbook #72)
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