Hardie Cement Pre-Painted House Siding: How Are Nail Heads Handled ?

Hello:
I understand that the Hardie Fiber/Cement clapboard type of house siding comes pre-painted if one desires.
Question: how is the problem of the nail heads then handled ? Do you have to hire someone to just go around and put a dab of paint on each nail head ?
What am i missing here, please ?
Thanks, Bob
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Robert11 wrote:

the siding is blind nailed, that is the siding is nailed about an inch from the upper edge and piece above covers it. in those spots where this is not possible (like up against the eave), then yes, you have someone dab a spot of paint on the nail. color matched touch up paint and color matched caulk should be available.
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You will need to caulk the nailheads using the same material that was applied to the butt joints between sections.
wrote:

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Robert11 wrote:

Be aware, priming and painting is a all side proposition. Hardie siding panels are ONLY primed/painted on the Top Side. All cuts and the back side need to be primed for long life and any exposed nail heads and seams need paint/caulk.
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@yahoo.com (Robert Gammon) says...

Why in the world would you back-prime cement siding? I can see it with wood, where you nail the siding up against the sheathing, but cement board needs an air gap to keep condensation from rotting out the framing. With proper ventilation, painted one side should be fine.
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Larry Caldwell wrote:

Hardie Panel or Hardie Plank both are heavy paper coated with cement. When they are in long term contact with moisture, they will fall apart. Nailed to the frame, there is NO air circulation, so if moisture gets behind the siding, it will fail.
Failure to prime the backside was a common, almost universal building practice here in the early 1980s. Almost all of these homes have had to have their siding replaced as a result of the builders NOT following mfg's directions with wood siding.
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Robert Gammon wrote:

OK, but the OP questions were about Hardie plank and not wood. Hardie doesn't mention anything about painting the backside.
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@yahoo.com (Robert Gammon) says...

You are missing the point. Cement based siding has been on the market long enough for the first wave of house repairs to start coming in. It has become obvious that you do NOT attach cement board siding directly to the sheathing. Cement board siding WILL draw moisture, particularly on the north side of the house, causing rot in the sheathing and framing. The way to avoid that is to install thin furring strips to space the siding off of the framing enough to provide air circulation between the siding and sheathing. Lath will work, but most installers now use 1/2" treated furring strips.
With proper ventilation behind the siding, back priming is not necessary.
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WRONG .. .. .. I've seen samples of Hardie product sealed in a block of Lucite filled with water .. .. there was absolutely no evidence that the material was in any way affected. This is/was, in fact one of their main selling points.
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<<<__ Bob __>>> wrote:

Put any Hardie product in direct contact with dirt where rain falls on it, and TRY to pick it up two years later.
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