hard to start chain saw

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I have a cheap($100)poulin mod p3314wsa gas chain saw that .is very hard to start. When I pull on the starting rope it feels like there is way too much compression. Is this normal or what? Maybe !~m just getting old and weak. HELP Herb
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On 3/24/2015 11:29 AM, herb white wrote:

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mike wrote:

And then pull the muffler and check/clean it . Plugged muffler can do that too . I have a Homelite that I have to dump the chain oil when I put it up , it leaks into the crankcase if I leave it .
--
Snag



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On 3/24/2015 3:11 PM, mike wrote:

Some times, removing the spark plug, and then pull the start cord a couple times will loosen up an old machine. If not, it helps with the diagnostic.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2015 19:31:21 -0400, Stormin Mormon

It's just a REALLY snappy high compression 2 stroke. It'll tear the starting rope right out of your hand if it doesn't start.
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By hard to start, is it just the ammount of pull on the rope, or do you have to pull the rope 10 to 20 times to get it to start ?
If it takes lots of times to pull the rope, youmay need to rebuild the carbarator. Could be it may just need adjusting. If it is like one of my saws, you need a special nutdriver looking tool to do it.
Does it run ok after starting ?
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 10:01:50 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

Hmmmm,,,,, Just curious what this special tool is, and what brand is the saw? Is it one of those torx things with the pin in the middle they use on a lot oc computers? (Safety torx)
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The shaft is hollow, but instead of a hex socket, there are about 10 or so small splines. The screw on the carborator does not hace a slot,but the outside of it has about 10 or so splines that match the nutdriver looking thing. I found one of those on line.
I have an older weed eater I think it is a Homelight,but not sure as I gave it to my son. The screws for it had a flat round head with a small hole about 1/16 of an inch deep that is off center. For some reason they will not sell that tool. Some of those government regulations. I removed those screws and cut a screw slot in it with my Dremmal tool so I could adjust it. A search for those tools will give about 3 or 4 special tools for the odd ball screw heads.
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 18:03:02 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

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On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 19:39:53 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which are viewed here:
http://www.sfc-dubai.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/12-Point-Bolt.jpg
Aren't those also called external torx?
I had those on the tailgate hinges on one of my pickup trucks. I believe it was the 88 Ford I had a few years ago.
What i dont understand is why they make all these special bolts, the plain old hex bolts worked just fine. I think they just want to sell more tools!!! It's just like my toolbox once had 8 or so box wrenches, now it has DOUBLE that amount because I need both SAE and Metric. And as my eyes get worse from old age, it seems they make the lettering smaller on them, so I am forced to try all of them until I find one that fits.
It seems that no matter what is manufactured these days, the end goal is to make it as difficult and complicated as possible. This is particularly true with vehicles and machinery, computer operating systems, and cellphones. But it goes beyond that. Like making 3/4" plywood 25/32 so it wont match up with the older stuff. And why does a portable radio these days need 40 buttons and 16 knobs? They used to work fine with three knobs (Tuning - Volume - Tone), and two switches (Power - AM/FM).
Apparently they have all forgot the KISS method.
Keep It Simple Stupid
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 20:55:00 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Nope, Torx is 6 point.

BiHex or 12 point allows higher torque on a smaller head. Header bolts and cyl head bolts are both good examples - where there isn't room for a typical hex bolt head or nut and an "allen" head isn't practical. Torx has better drive than philips or robertson - and even better than allen for the same size (more linear surface area for the tool to "bite" on)
Then there are the "security" versions and "one way" heads that can be tightened but not removed.

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difficult for the home owner just to keep his stuff up. I found about 6 or more different tools just to adjust the stupid carburators on the small engines. They have a D a double D, Packman, those splines , the off center pin and another one or two that I don't remember from all my searching. All to turn a screw less than 2 inches long and about a # 10 or # 8 if they were the American size. They calim the government makes them do that to keep the home owner from adjusting the carbs for air polution. Don't they know anyone can get the tools even if they have to be ordered from China off ebay ? Then there is a torx screw to get the covers off to get to the carburator if it needs to be rebuilt.
Some of the worse cars I remember are the ones that had metric and American bolts on the same car.
Now you don't need double, but 3 or 4 times as many as the torx and reverse torx and a few other odd balls. As good wrenches last almost forever (often have a lifetime warrenty) I think they come out with the new types just to sell more tools.
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 23:43:59 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

do everything to make life difficult, such as those crappy new gas cans.

Yea, I have one of those cars! Its a 1989 Chevy station wagon, which I keep for it's antique value, but do still drive it one and awhile. Working on that car is a nightmare when it comes to try to figure out which wrench to use. Just to change the alternator belt requires both SAE and Metric. I know that for fact, since I have done it several times and gotten pissed off each time too. The same is true for the many of the body bolts

I agree with that! I did pick up a kit that has all those oddball sizes. It's just for the small ones, (1/4" nut driver bits), but it has all the security bits, other oddballs, and all the common such as torx, allen, phillips, etc....
One type I really do like, are the torx. When they changed from phillips to torx on deck screws and (some) drywall screws, that was the best thing they ever did. I cant count how many phillips bits I have ruined over the years, or ruined the screw heads. I have never yet ruined a torx bit, although some of my oldest ones started to get sloppy, so I replaced them. But they sure made life easier, and there have only been a few torx screw heads that I have ruined.
A local lumber yard has COLORED torx bits for all the sizes needed for the standard deck screws. They cost a buck more, but that was also a great improvement. I know exactly which one to grab, depending on the screw.
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From my understandign the phillips were suspose to torq out to prevent over tightning. I have never liked them. That may have worked for some, but for things like the deck screws you often need all the power you can get. If you are in business, I can see where colored bits will pay off. When I was working there were a couple of tools I used out of a socket set and painted them a color so I could just grab them. We did not have tool boxes to carry around with us, but just a bunch of draws in the shop so we had to carry what we thought we needed all over the plant.
I have ordered a couple of inexpensive small tool sets from China off ebay. It is amazing how many differant small screw types there are. Not sure what they are called, but a couple were like a 3 sided phillips. I doubt the tools would hold up under heavy use, but for home use where I might need to use them just a couple of times they should be beter than nothing.
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On 3/27/2015 5:52 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

http://www.harborfreight.com/18-volt-14-in-cordless-variable-speed-hex-impact-driver-68853.html
I got one of these about a year ago, and it sure helps with driving screws into decks.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Fri, 27 Mar 2015 15:45:40 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

On those GMs, all of the metric body screws were a blue green colouer - and virtually all of the metric screws were "oddball" metrics. "normal" metrics, as used by the japs, are 8mm on 5mm bolts,10mm heads on 6mm bolts,12mm on 8mm bolts, 14mm on 10mm bolts, and17mm on 12mm bolts and 19mm on 14mm bolts.
The "squareheads" add 7mm bolts with 11mm heads, and use 13mm instead of 12mm on the 8mm bolts. and 17mm on 10mm bolts, 19mm on 12mm, and 22 on 14.
Ansi/iso throws 16, 18 and 21 into the mix.
When I started working on Metric Toyotas back in 1970, all I needed was 8,10,12,14,17,19, and 22mm.
In a pinch, a 9/16 inch could sub for 14mm (.55 inch) a 11/16" could fill in for a 17mm (.669") and a 3/4" worked for 19mm (.748") and a 13/16"s a snug fit on a 21mm (.826") A 3/4 inch worked on 22mm (.866")
In the Din/Ansi world a 7/16" would work for 11mm (.433")

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On 03/27/2015 12:55 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

KISS principle is yesterday's soup du jour.
Most corporations typically roll out a new "Program of the Month" about every three years. It gives the many layers of management something easy and measurable to do to justify their 6-figure existence.
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The company I worked for did that at one time. Toward the last 10 years it sort of stopped. The business had turned down so I don't think they had the money to waste on that sort of thing.
I just thought that about every 4 years a new class of college students came through and they had to have some kind of idea to justify a job for them.
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On Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at 1:29:31 PM UTC-5, herb white wrote:

much compression. Is this normal or what? Maybe !~m just getting old and w eak. HELP Herb
I was in here posting and noticed this post. I'll just mention this - it m ay be worthless but ... twice (lawn mower and saw) this has fixed things fo r me.
There is a key on the flywheel, maybe not on your unit, that holds the posi tion of the wheel on the power shaft. The key is designed to break away. If it is damaged (bent), even a little bit, the wheel's position changes ev er so slightly and the magnet, attached to it, arrives late/early to the ma gneto or spark timing circuit. If your saw has such an arrangement, look at the key (keyway?). I replaced mine and it was night and day.
This may have NOTHING to do with your unit. I was just so surprised at the effect of a sightly off position flywheel I thought I mention it.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com posted for all of us...

This is a good post. I didn't see any prior mention of this.
To OP what was found?
--
Tekkie *Please post a follow-up*

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