hard to remove a bathtub spout?

Is it hard to remove the spout on a bathtub, 36 years old.
How tightly would it be on?
Chrome-plated metal.
Corroded, I'd like to put in a new one, but I don't want to break off the part that points down and then have the water shooting out sideways.
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On Thursday, December 17, 2015 at 4:49:05 AM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

https://www.plumbingsupply.com/info-tubspouts.html
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2015 03:10:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Excellent link explaining the different types of spouts.
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2015 03:10:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Very good. Thank you. Wait a second. It's got a girl talking. So I will have to check everything she says on www.plumbifact.org , to see if she's telling the truth.
But if she is, I had no idea they made new, easy-install designs. I have a spout I got at a rummage sale, which I figured I would need to install before I sold the house. But maybe there is easier.
Wow, at the end, they had 14 more videos. But if I depended on videos, I wouldn't spend as much time with youse guys.
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2015 03:10:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

And it says "Step 2: Apply approximately 4-6 wraps of PTFE thread sealing tape" Either that's girly stuff or it's good advice. But I never thought one could use more than 2 or 3 layers. Very interesting.
BTW, I think normally a spout would last a couple hundred years, but in order to keep the bath water warm, I have to add a little hot water most of the time. I don't know yet if the water cools off or I just get used to the temp and have to have it hotter.
And the water falling into the bath water makes so much noise it's hard to hear the radio or tv, so I take a sock and a rubber band and run the sock down to the water level, so the water makes barely a sound as it enters. I've been doing this for 20+ years and the first sock lasted 20+ years. Would have lasted longer, but the washer on the cold water valve got bad and the sock stayed wet for a few days, and then the sock rotted. And that also hurried the rotting of the spout, which was getting pitted on the outside, but afaik hadn't lost much strength until recently.
I replaced the washers (and the stems) and added a new sock, but this time I used one of those socks they give you in the hospital, with rubber treads, so you won't fall down.
Since I don't have polished floors here, I find them useless for any purpose, so I used one on the faucet. All but one or two times, it always dried completely within a couple hours of my bath but still fell apart in 3 months. That's actually good. That means they aren't wasting money making quality socks that most people throw away after a day or two's use. (Or it's cotton and the other was partly synthetic.)
What's interesting is that I can turn the volume up so that I can hear it well with the water running and no sock, but when the tub is full and and I turn the water off or mosly off, the radio, which wasn't too loud before, is now uncomfortably loud, and I have to get out of the tub to turn the volume down. (With the TV, I have a volume control on the wall next to the tub, but the current tv no longer works well with the wall mounted speakers, a woofer and a tweeter I took from a 1930's record player, and have been using in two consecutive bathrooms over the last 40 years. Another small tv doesn't even have an earphone jack but I'm sure I have one that does, or I'll put one in, and I'll change tv's soon.)
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wrote:

Just wear a BRA when you do it, in case it's "girly stuff". That way you'll be safe. :)
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On 12/17/2015 04:48 AM, Micky wrote:

If the spout has been on there for 36 years, you might wanna say a few prayers before you start cranking on that wrench.
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Gustav posted for all of us...

+1 Thar she blows!
--
Tekkie

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| Is it hard to remove the spout on a bathtub, 36 years old. | | How tightly would it be on? |
Be very careful if you don't want to end up opening the wall. It's not unusual that they get frozen on. On the bright side, the metal is generally soft. You should be able to cut away part of the threads with a jigsaw using a metal blade, in order to get it to turn.
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2015 09:26:38 -0500, "Mayayana"

Assuming it won't unscrew, I can break away most of the spout, and then I can apply an electric jig saw, with the blade perpendicular??? to the wall, parallel to the pipe??, just by holding it firmly?? with noting to rest the base plate of the saw on?? I can do that?

Also if you could email me your email address, I have a question to ask about a previous thread that I can't find anymore. I'd appreciate it.
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| Assuming it won't unscrew, I can break away most of the spout, and | then I can apply an electric jig saw, with the blade perpendicular??? | to the wall, parallel to the pipe??, just by holding it firmly?? with | noting to rest the base plate of the saw on?? I can do that? |
I've done it before. I had to do that recently with a tub drain, actually. It was brass, so it was easy to cut. Once it's partly cut through (without cutting the copper threads) it should turn. But as long as you don't damage the pipe by twisting you can also solder on a new end, if you need to.
| Also if you could email me your email address, I have a question to | ask about a previous thread that I can't find anymore. I'd appreciate | it.
Just remove the NONONO?
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2015 22:09:09 -0500, "Mayayana"

Okay. If you've done it!

Good point.

Right. Sorry. I forgot that was in there.
misc07 at bigfoot dot com
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2015 02:48:04 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

Good idea.

I think I have this very set, or at least another cheap pair. I have another one with a metal handle and a woven-flat-rope-like strap that so far hasn't worked for anything. I don't know where I got it and I wouldn't call it much more expensive, but they must have had a reason to make it like they dis.

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Yes, on the surface these were stupid questions, but they got me some good answers.

Copper. No set screw. No liquid wrench yet, because i haven't started. LW is a good idea.
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On 12/17/2015 9:29 PM, Micky wrote:

How to remove very dearty Bath , with ajax work but a lot of scrobbing
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