Harbor Freight Reviews

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Zootal wrote:

WE? I don't think that I would care, at close to 150 years old.
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2010 13:20:37 -0500, Zootal

Since you were involved, I'm sure you know that most of the code involved was custom and not available for public review. That makes references difficult. You can find some in IEEE Spectrum though.

I'm happy that the systems you were involved in were in relatively good shape. That doesn't mean they all were. I could turn your request for references back on you.

Because someone brought it up. Hey, how long you been around Usenet? You tellin' me there needs to be a REASON to rehash something? Bah.

Yes, I fear that's true. Oh, it won't be quite the same thing -- the world of DP (excuse me, IT) will have changed enormously. It will get new names about every 25 years, just to keep it fresh -- DP, IT, what next? At present everyone is being careful about dates. There will never again be the pressure to save two bytes, since storage is so cheap now. But in 50 years, no one working will have gone through it. Handwritten dates will always drop the century, and eventually this will slip into data systems. Exactly how, I don't know, but somehow it will. Have we fixed the 2039 problems yet? Not AFAIK.
(And apropos a response, I agree with "we". I won't be alive, but "we" as a profession and the human race will go through it. Those ignorant of history etc.)
Edward
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2010 12:03:38 -0400, Edward Reid

The real problem was that much software had been in use *way* beyond when the programmers assumed it would be. Other issues included the programmer's stupidity (programming an exception to an exception, but not its exception :). In a lot of cases what was really scary part was that there was no source code or tools to recreate the programs companies relied on for their business. Y2K solved a lot of that as an aside.
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2010 12:03:38 -0400, Edward Reid

I'd hate to dissagree - but Y2K was a lot of Hoopla - and extremely low actual problems.
The trafic signal scenario? Extremely easy to get around. The calendar repeats itself on a very predictable schedule - so for the rest of the lifespan of the control system a simple reset of the date to a year with the same calendar, in the same point of the schedule, is all that was required. If that year, was, for instance, 1942, there was another 58 years to go without worrying about the weekend schedules being thrown off.
There was a whole lot of money made by "y2k analysts" that was a pure rip-off - call it fraud to be accurate - and a lot of fearmongering.
The only place it really ended up being any kind of an issue was on mainframe actuarial systems (big insurance companies running large databases on antiquated systems running Fortran, as an example)
Most of these systems had already oulived their design lifespan - having been programmed in the '60s and '70s, with the expectation that they would be replaced in the '80s or '90s.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Microdyne hired one who didn't know that XT computers didn't have a real time clock and who wanted every PC in the company replaced because most were still Win 95. The fact that most of our test software was written in the 3.1 or 95 days didn't sink in.
He, and the others in IT would wipe things off your computer without asking, including test software that was written in house "Because you don't have a license to use it on this computer!" Other things like ISP (In System Programming) modules to program circuit boards. They were passed around, since we were always short. Engineer would take them after the end of first shift, then be pissed off when you wanted them back. IT demanded that you uninstall the software from the computer you borrowed it from, even though it was available on the OEM website for free download.
The worst was when they wiped a test bed system running windows 2.0 and installed Win 95. Luckily, I had kept a couple sets of old floppy backups and managed to get it running after wasting a full day looking for files that could still be read. I'm sure that other people had similar problems with Y2K crap like that.

I had a friend who was servicing Data General minicomputers and a lot of computer terminals. Most of his customers migrated to a server & PCs rather than fool with updating their old software. The last I heard, he was repairing PCs.
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2010 18:57:17 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sure, as I said, lots of times the fix was easy. It was the analysis that was hard. And in your example, the analysis had to determine that the kludge that you propose (and it's clearly a kludge, not a fix) wouldn't cause any undesirable side effects. Kludges have a nasty habit of causing unforeseen problems. In addition, it could not wait until 2000-01-01, because too many systems would have needed attention all at the same time. Many simple ones could have been repaired quickly after they failed, but many failures appearing all at once would have overwhelmed the capacity to fix them.

No doubt. The DP/IT profession is as rife with opportunists and incompetents as any other. That doesn't mean that everything done is opportunistic or incompetent.

That's an extremely limited view of what happened. And in any case, ten years ago those systems ran an awful lot of what was important to business. It's dropped a lot today but hasn't gone away. Oh, and insurance companies seldom used Fortran. They mostly used COBOL. I haven't heard any recent figures, but I suspect that there's still more production code written in COBOL than in any other language. Fortran code was generally less of a problem due to its emphasis on numerical work.

But they hadn't been replaced. That's part of the point. The other point that I make, though, is that they were not designed with any such expectation. They weren't designed with a lifespan at all. In the 60s and 70s, programming on this scale was still so new that programmers weren't thinking about how long their code would last at all.
Edward
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From what I know, the only problem was subtracting dates. I wonder how much would have been a problem, even with no correction. Sounds like more trouble than I would have expected.
I'm not enough of a computer guy to know for sure. My prediction in 1999 was that we'd have about a week of glitches and rolling black outs and other problems. I'm glad we didn't have even that much trouble.
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wrote:

    Thank you so VERY much for putting those two concepts together in one thought - Pelosi and nekid.
    Now I have to go douche my brain again .....
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On Sep 30, 3:15pm, .p.jm.@see_my_sig_for_address.com wrote:

You're welcome. >;-]
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.p.jm.@see_my_sig_for_address.com wrote:

Don't forget the pipe cleaners.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

They can aways get clothes...
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On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 17:33:09 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

And stupid cock sucking mormons and cock sucking cross posting retards will never have any brains.
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Oh, Come ON, King... don't hold back. Tell us how you really feel.
(only... don't crosspost when you do it -- by YOUR rules) <G>
LLoyd
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The King wrote:

I see you're using a newsreader with a vaguely French-sounding name.
I don't like the French.
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Do you suck a homophica, or blow it? Does someone make a homophica which is three inches longer?
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Thanks to both of you
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On Tue, 28 Sep 2010 12:42:33 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I bought a bunch of things and have never been disappointed that I remember. I bought one of the 4x8 trailers for 200 or 250, had it delivered to my brother's in Texas, assembled it there, and drove back with some of my old furniture on it. Worked fine, still have it, but have not much need for it. Oh yeah, the wiring to the lights was complete, but very flimsy, and the clips that clipped it to the frame didn't work well, and the wires dropped out and got cut. I bought a new harness, from them, packaged seaprately. . I should tape it on or better yet drlll holes and use wire holders. Maybe I will.
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re: "...have never been disappointed that I remember."
You mean you weren't disappointed that "the clips that clipped it to the frame didn't work well, and the wires dropped out and got cut"?
What would it have taken to disappoint you?
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-snip-

I've got the same trailer with the same shortcoming- and I'm not disappointed. [I've also been pondering for years where I'll move that license holder to]
If I had paid $1000 for it, or if it had major mechanical problems, I'd be disappointed. But for $250- it is the cat's nuts.
Jim
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re:"...where I'll move that license holder to"
I bought a very similar trailer from Wal-Mart many, many years ago. It was the last one they had, the box was all beat up, so I negotiated a bit and got it for under $200. I added some nice wooden walls and sold it for $250 after a *lot* of use over a 5 year period.
If your plate holder is the same as mine was - a cheap piece of plastic attached to the brake light - here's what I did:
I screwed the plate directly to the back wall. Since I always used the trailer with the "box" on, the plate was always with the trailer.
As far as "disappointed" with the wiring, yes, I was. It's easy to rationalize it based on the cost, but I was still "disappointed" when the wiring failed soon after I started using the trailer. I rewired it and put the wires in plastic tubing tie-wraped to the frame and never had another problem.
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