Hanging kitchen cabinets?

I see most manufacturered kitchen cabinets are meant to be installed by screwing through their back panel and into wall studs. Wondering if I can just as safely use anchor bolts from above and hang them from the ceiling, so that I can remove them if I need to access the wall behind them. All opinions appreciated.
-Theodore
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Why would you reinvent the wheel? When you hang/install cabinets you attach each one to each other. How would you deal with that? I think if you ask a question like the one you did you probably should not be installing cabinets. Just my 2 cents.
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will need to access the wall behind the cabinets on an infrequent basis because I'm considering having these cabinets immediately in front of the basement wall against which my house trap & drain are mounted (see post previous to this one).
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------020007050702050104030401 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
I've lived in 3 homes over the past 60 years. One older home in Chicago (sewer) and two newer homes in Tennessee, both on septic systems. I've NEVER had the need to access the drain/clean-out you are referring to here. It is an EXTREME situation that would require one to need such access .. .. ALMOST all clogs can be cleared from other access points. If you really did need to ever access that clean-out, sure, you'd have to remove that cabinet or set of cabinets. As long as you don't go crazy with all kinds of trim & molding, it's not a real big job to take them down, but I really doubt you'll ever have the need to do so.
Just my opinion based on experience.

--------------020007050702050104030401 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000"> <br> <br> I've lived in 3 homes over the past 60 years.&nbsp;&nbsp; One older home in Chicago (sewer) and two newer homes in Tennessee, both on septic systems.&nbsp;&nbsp; I've NEVER had the need to access the drain/clean-out you are referring to here.&nbsp;&nbsp; It is an EXTREME situation that would require one to need such access .. .. ALMOST all clogs can be cleared from other access points.&nbsp;&nbsp; If you really did need to ever access that clean-out, sure, you'd have to remove that cabinet or set of cabinets.&nbsp;&nbsp; As long as you don't go crazy with all kinds of trim &amp; molding, it's not a real big job to take them down, but I really doubt you'll ever have the need to do so.<br> <br> Just my opinion based on experience.<br> <br> <br> <blockquote cite="mid: snipped-for-privacy@a1g2000hsb.googlegroups.com" type="cite"> <pre wrap=""><!---->Evodawg, I understand what you are saying. My situation is that I will need to access the wall behind the cabinets on an infrequent basis because I'm considering having these cabinets immediately in front of the basement wall against which my house trap &amp; drain are mounted (see post previous to this one). </pre> </blockquote> </body> </html>
--------------020007050702050104030401--
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install a small flush access box w/door in the wall, and cut out enough of the back panel of the cabinet to be able to open the door and access the cleanout. That's how I'd do it.
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Yes ,,no cabinets for you "

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On Fri, 30 May 2008 21:28:34 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Why can't you remove them when they are attached to the wall as easily as if they are attached to the ceiling?
What's the difference?

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

suitable location to put a vertical screw, and your bulkhead is framed with suitable blocking to screw into. Into the wall really works a lot better- screws are a lot stronger at right angles to the pulling force, gravity in this case. Don't try screwing through the thin top of the case- the screws will pull through.
If you want easy-off cabinets, hang them European style, on cleats. Undo one or two screws in bottom edge, and just lift them off the cleat. Metal hanging rails are available, or you can just rip a hardwood 1x4 down the center at a 45 angle, and make your own. (In Europe, it is common to take the cabinets and light fixtures and such when you move- they are considered part of the furniture over there.)
-- aem sends....
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Pulling through is my concern too. Can you explain the cleats more? Do you have a link or example you can suggest I look at?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Google is your friend:
<http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%27french+cleat%27+diagram&btnG=Google+Search
brings up about 53,000 links.
Short version- a rail screwed to wall, that has an upper lip that sticks out. A rail, screwed to cabinet, that has a lower lip that sticks out. You hook the rail on the cabinet onto the rail on the wall, and gravity does the work. Depending on the cabinet design, you may need spacer blocks at the bottom, and trim or a decorative end panel to hide the < 3/4 " gap behind the cabinet. If kids are in the house (or you live in earthquake country), a couple safety screws through the bottom rail of the cabinet, into the wall or spacer blocks, is cheap insurance. A full cabinet falling on you unexpectedly can mess up your whole day.
-- aem sends...
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I hung my cabinets in my laundry room in a similar manner - mainly because I was doing it myself without a second pair of hands to hold them while I mounted them. I ripped a 1x8 on a 45 degree angle. I then screwed one half to the wall with the bevel sloping down, and bolted the other 1/2 to the cabinet. A 1x2 spacer at the bottom kept thing straight and was able to lift the cabinets on the wall and then put a couple screws in thru the 1x2 to hold things on the wall.

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On 6/1/2008 6:30 PM Mark spake thus:

That's exactly what I was going to suggest, although you certainly don't need a 45 angle; 15 or so should be plenty. Easiest way to hang cabinets.
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Hmm,
You want to transfer the entire load of a filled kitchen cabinet to the wooden joints that form the top and sides of the cabinet. There is usually a large gap here, without a shim you would bow the top and stress the joint even more. That could be 200 pounds focused on 4 #12 screws and a bit of wood. Even if the construction of the cab could take it, you would need to reinforce with large washers to keep from tearing through the wood.
If you had any mechanical engineering knowledge at all you would see this is just a way to break the cabinets. Particularly if they are not full plywood construction.
Cabinets should also be screwed to each other and to as many studs as possible. Once they are up, there is no easy way to get them down regardless of where you put the screws

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On 05/31/08 12:28 am snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I am sure that the installation instructions for our "Medallion"-brand cabinets (purchased from Menards -- Wisconsin-based chain) described a ceiling-anchored option. Check with the manufacturer of any you plan to purchase.
Perce
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