Hanging an interior door

I went to the Depot the other day, waited 3 weeks for my custom interior door with frame, and decided one day to install it into my bathroom.
I guess the trick is to make it plumb and square?
That's some freaking trick, I'll tell you.
After installing the door, and not having it fit, I called the 800# for Premdor of Canada, the manufacturer. It's actually Masonite, a company I'm sure you've all heard of.
They must have a pretty busy call center up there, cause I could tell the gal I was talking to was
1) under educated 2) over worked 3) somewhat stressed 4) likely underpaid
However --- insightful, she was.
Tack the top hinge corner, then shim the frame till it's plumb and square.
Maybe I needed a second person. Maybe I needed a better level. (Is there really a difference in my plastic 5' level?)
So I ended up removing material, from where the door *didn't* fit, painted it up, and it didn't fit **again**.
The company rep told me to get a qualified contractor. Bollocks, I said.
She also told me if it's not plumb and square the first time - I'm screwed for life. A real horror story.
My question is:
Is that true, will it get worse over time?
Is there a trick to understanding what the MAGIC words plumb and square mean?
The door was a bargain, or at least I kinda though so.
I'd like to replace 4 more, but I don't have the funds, nor am I sure the patience, and definitely NOT the skills.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I guess the trick is to make it plumb and square?
I'd like to replace 4 more, but I don't have the funds, nor am I sure the patience, and definitely NOT the skills. snip.
I suspect by the fourth one, you'll have it down. I'll also bet that there are instructions somewhere on the doorjamb. Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Go to the library and get a book on door installation or see if there is a video at your local home improvement store. The Internet isn't always the best answer for everything. Much easier to have the information in a book form with pictures so you can flip through it at your leisure.
Doug

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>
Agreed,
Internet is better for *real time*, but pales in comparison to a library. Additionally, reading a computer screen is a pain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just a quick question. After you shimmed it, did you nail or screw the door way to the wall studs? Once it is attached, it won't move unless your house moves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's what I thought.
I actually ended up using some screws, because my finish nails weren't long enough. (In some places)
At least I countersunk the heads, so I could spackle and paint on top of them.
Yeah, I think the doom and gloom was a lot of hooey.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Plumb: Means that the vertical edge is, well, vertical. Square: In this case, means that the door lines up with the hole.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 27 Apr 2005 21:13:33 -0400, "ng_reader"

With all due respect to the door company lady, no.
What you do first is check that the hinge-side jack stud in the rough opening is plumb. Following her instructions, if the top of the stud was leaning "away" from the opening then there wouldn't be any way to shim the hinge-side of the door frame so that it was plumb.
Center the door in the opening. If the jack stud is leaning "into" the opening, drive a finishing nail into the top of the door frame, then use shims to level the bottom. If the jack stud is leaning "away" from the opening, nail at the bottom first. Drive the nail in just far enough that the door frame is secure. Then align the plumb of the frame using a level on both the face and edge of the frame.
Add shims under each hinge point. Insert two shims from opposite sides so the frame remains square (i.e. 90 degrees) to the sides of the opening. Don't force them in or you could bow the frame. Then nail through them. Use your long level to make sure the frame is straight (neither cupped nor bowed). Then complete driving in the nails.
This will ensure a plumb door. The rest is just sighting along the reveal between the door and the frame to make sure it's even, using shims as before.

No. If the door is really out, use a sawzall to cut the nails and start over. It just means more nail holes to fill later.

Only if you didn't fasten it securely in the rough opening.

square = 90 degrees to the intersecting side(s) plumb = exactly vertical on both axis. level = exactly horizontal on both axis. (bonus word!)
Steve Manes Brooklyn, NY http://www.magpie.com/house
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

square.
screwed
Thanks!
Good post, nice site, nice house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.