Hang drywall and paint

    any tips n tricks to cutting and hanging dry wall and making the seems disappear with that tape/paste materials?
any tips on painting to make wall look solid, without it looking like it has those deep lines in it?
thnx
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...and maybe you'd also like to know how to hang the doors, lay the carpet, replace the furnace and rebrick the chimney too?
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Mmm...let me ask my Mexican side kick on that one sweetie.
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Kudzy;2932843 Wrote:

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Dymphna
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Go to your local public library and take out the Time Life book on drywalling.
Or, go to Home Depot and buy one.
Check your local listings for DIY, HGTV, TLC, and PBS. There's bound to be a home improvement show on where they go through drywalling in excruciating detail in the next 48 hours.
It's not rocket science. Just don't expect perfection out of your first attempt.
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snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote in wrote:

This is one area where it's good to help out others at their place. Hopefully leave the "how not to do it"s at their places.
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If you are going to paint it - be sure to rent a machine to do the texturing. This will take away from those lines quite a bit. If you have flat drywall - everything shows.
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Dymphna
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Practice. I'm not trying to be rude -- drywall is just one of those skills.
It's a bit like asking for tips to become a great pianist. You need a good teacher and lots and lots of practice.

Textured finish, will hide a lot of imperfections.
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Everything you need to know is in the USG Construction Handbook online as a 357 page PDF file.
Joe
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Hire the job out. Truthfully, if you've never done drywall and painting, the best advice to save you time, disappointment, and probably money in the long run is to hire it out to professionals.
If you are willing to be satisfied with the knowledge that you did the work despite any flaws, delays, and the expense of probably having to buy a couple extra sheets of drywall to cover the miscuts and breaks, an extra tub or 2 of drywall mud as it takes you a couple extra coats to get it done and account for the globs dropped along the way, and twice (or more) the time a professional would take, you can find a lot of good books with tips on doing the job. But practice is the key to getting a professional look.

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Ditto on hiring a pro...Watch him and take notes , photos , ask questions , ect for next time....Try google for info if you MUST do it yourself...Way to much to type out here if you don't already know the basics....Good luck...
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benick wrote:

Dang- did it again- meant to reply to group, and only sent to previous poster instead. (and I've only been on Usenet since the mid 80's...) ---------
I'll third that recommendation. I might do a small patch myself, but for anything extensive, it is worth it to hire a pro, for the lack of damage to your blood pressure if nothing else. They make it look so freaking easy....
I grew up in construction, I have the drywall-finishing knowledge in my head, but somehow my hands can't translate that knowledge into doing things the right way. No substitute for hands-on experience and constant practice. Not like framing or trim work, where you can do one step at a time. More like finishing concrete, where once you start, you have to keep chugging.
--
aem sends...

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benick wrote:

reminds me of drywall mud. Take a look on youtube they have a lot of how to video's. Try a small area and see how it goes. But if your not good with your hands then let a pro do it. Rich
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"Pedro Sanchez IV" wrote:

Measure the drywall twice, then cut it.
Apply a light coat of stuff to the joints, apply some tape over the seam, then another light coat over that.
Feather it out twice with wider thingies, using the finish stuff last, and sanding it in between.
When it's all dry, you paint it.
It's a pretty easy skill to learn if you go at it slowly and deliberately. It helps to do your first wall somewhere like the garage where a small booboo can be overlooked.
Jon
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On Mon, 06 Apr 2009 15:47:15 -0400, Pedro Sanchez IV

Check your local library. There are books on drywalling and painting that cover many of the techniques to make the job easier. I found careful inspection greatly improved results.
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