Handyman Put Cement On Top of Old Concrete (using sand) -Will It Hold?

My handyman isn't much of a concrete person but he attempted to do a path for me. He used forms and hand mixed the sakrete fast drying concrete. Unfortunately he wasn't great at pitching it and now there are puddles. So to fix it, he mixed some sand with the gravel and drilled the concrete rough, then topped it. It's a different ugly color now and I'm not sure that it's even going to hold? We have harsh winters here. Is there any solution to fixing this?
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On Thursday, October 13, 2016 at 9:14:06 PM UTC-5, NYArtist wrote:

You might be able to stain both the old and new concrete and come up with a more or less uniform coloring.
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replying to hrhofmann, NYArtist wrote: Hi" Thanks. I did something unusual as the concrete was drying...I spinkled glitter on it so that the sidewalk sparkles so I probably wouldn't want to dye it but that's a great idea. I was wondering about skim coating it and then sprinkling the glitter on that. Do you think that the way he did the skimming it will hold?
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In typed:

Posting some photos would probably help if you are able to do that.
About how big is the "path"? I am guessing that if he mixed the Sakrete concrete himself, it is not a very large area.
The chances of the top coat repair job holding up are probably slim to none. It will surely crack and break off, probably even before next spring. And, the idea of trying to stain it or match it for color isn't going to work. Despite what the products say, and how they look in the sample color brochures, any type of stain or even acid wash is just going to look bad or worse than it already looks now.
I think the only solution at this point is to live with it for a while until the top coat starts breaking off (which it will soon do), and then have the original concrete "path" removed and have a new one poured and finished by an experienced concrete company.
Sorry, to sound so negative about all of this, but I have been through this a couple of times -- once on my own place and once when trying to help another handyman friend who also is not much of a concrete person go back and repair and stain a similar situation.
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I agree 100% and I have done lots of concrete. The trick starts with a good base, then well built forms that are pitched to drain the desired way. Once the concrete sets, you are done. It is either right or you chip it out and start over. That patch will spall off as soon as water seeps into the joint and freezes.
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On Friday, October 14, 2016 at 11:02:10 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

+1
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replying to TomR, NYArtist wrote: Thanks to all for suggestions and reaffirming my suspicions that this will not hold and was a waste of time and money...additionally he did another section of sidewalk (about 25" wide and 8 ft long) without using wide fortifier inside. I dont' know what's going on..he's an older gentleman (76) and maybe not concentrating so well at this point. When I rip the sidewalk out that he messed up, do I use a special blade to cut a straight line? What is the best way to do this? Thanks again.
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In typed:

Sorry, I don't really know the answer to your question. I guess it depends on what you have there now, which is not clear. Usually, there is a seam or line separating the old concrete from the new concrete section. Are you able to post any photos of what you have now?
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On Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 4:37:27 PM UTC-4, TomR wrote:

+1
Who knows without seeing what's there. From the post, I thought this was a whole new sidewalk, in which case it shouldn't have to be cut from anything.
The biggest headache isn't going to be separating it. It's going to be busting it all up and disposing of it.
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On Thursday, October 13, 2016 at 10:14:06 PM UTC-4, NYArtist wrote:

Small Claims Court
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DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

+1 Unfortunately this or have him completely remove this existing junk and have competent people do the work.
Did you talk him into it after you either got a higher price or found out he wasn't great with concrete?
--
Tekkie

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replying to NYArtist, NYArtist wrote: What would I used if I decide to dye it?
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In typed:

If you are interested in trying concrete dye or concrete stain, you can do a Google search for concrete dye or for concrete stain. You'll find lots of information and YouTube videos etc.
But, my guess is that none of these will work to solve your situation.
Good luck.
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