Handyman Price?

Page 2 of 3  
wrote:

And you can take off anytime you want, you make your own schedule.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

That must be a part time job. Full timers will work more. Plus, you work any day that has a "y" in it.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

And for half price. When I worked as an independent contractor, state tax, federal tax and social security took 52%.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Many years ago I used to have a sideline business selling and installing storm doors and windows. typical aluminum door was less than an hour, but I've done jobs that were three or four hours. Not seeing what was involved, neither of us can say if the time was fair or not. Being out of the business for many years, what I sold then could easily translate to $300 or more today for a quality product.

Billing dollars do not equate with earnings. While an unskilled laborer may earn $10 an hour, his company is billing $30 or more to cover costs, overhead, insurance, taxes, workman's comp. etc. I bill my help (unskilled) at $50 an hour.
skilled

Get or bill? It varies in different parts of the country, but my electrician bills $65, my plumber $55, boiler technician $90, welders, $60. computer network guy $100. All of these bill travel time also, sometimes at a lower rate. These guys also have a couple of weeks backlog of work because they are good at what they do and are fair in pricing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George E. Cawthon wrote: > As for labor costs, realize that $75 and hour translates into $150,000

$75/hr does NOT translate to a $150,000 salary. People need to quit equating a charged rate with hourly wages. They aren't equivalent. I don't do home repair, but am self-employed.
1. It's fairly difficult for someone doing work onsite to get a full 2000 hours directly billable to customers/clients. You can work "full-time" and still not get 2000 hours on invoices, especially if jobs are running 2 hours each. If you think you're going to get four 2-hour jobs into 8 hours, you're dreaming.
2. Self-employed people and business owners get to pay for things that an hourly wage employee do not and that all comes out of the gross. I get to pay for *both* sides of Social Security and Medicare (the matching portion of that deduction on the paycheck) or pay the 15% self-employment tax. I have to pay an accountant, lawyer, etc. for business-specific services that I never needed doing the same work as an employee. I also get to pay for health care directly, with no employer subsidization or group rates.
3. Self-employed people get to deal with the ups and downs of economic cycles and seasons FAR more directly than employees do. How many screen doors does a handyman install in January in Minnesota? How about July? If the work is seasonal (deck staining, personal income taxes, etc.), there may only be 5-6 months out of the year to earn money to keep going the rest of the year. There's no unemployment the rest of the year when you're self-employed.
One of the biggest mistakes people make when going from employee to self-employed is to just take their currently salary x 2000 hours and that's their new rate. They then find out, that for their industry, November to February is completely dead and they only make 25% of what they make in "normal" months. Suddenly, they've taken a paycut even though they're "making" what they did as an employee.
Last, and most importantly, price is not a function of cost (what it cost the handyman to do the work), but rather of demand. If he's busy enough (and his definition applies, not yours) at $75/hr, then that's in perfect balance with supply and demand. If not, he'll end up lowering his rates to get enough work.
Recently, I had more work than I had time, so I raised my rates. I raised them again when there wasn't any change. Eventually, I raised them until I had the right amount of work to match my "supply" of time. If I decide to cut back to half-time or any other supply reduction, the same thing will apply.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J Wynia wrote:

That's all wonderful basic economics but everyone pays taxes. When you calculate how much a person makes, you don't figure how many deductions they make, their gambling debts, etc. Note that I also said if working full time. I'm glad for you that you can keep increasing your fees and still have plenty of employment. Those less fortunate have to reduce their fees to maintain full employment. All of which has nothing to do with a guy spending 2-1/2 hours at a cost of $150, which without more information, should have taken way less time and way less cost in many parts of the country.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Anyone in the building trades in my area who needs to drop fees to get enough work is doing something seriously wrong.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He helped your husband? Or did your husband help him? If I as a tradesman showed up on a job & the homeowner wanted to help, I'd have to charge them 30% more than usual. <G>
Seriouusly though, you didn't say where you're at. But it sounds reasonable.
Reminds me of a sign in a mechanics shop.
Labor rates:
$50/hour If you watch- $60/hour If you help- $70/hour If you worked on it first- $80/hour
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Next time, try saying something like, "How much do you charge?" at the beginning of the project.
It is real easy to do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
patga wrote:

No. You should have asked how much to install the door before you hired the handyman. Realize that a handyman may be just as qualified as anyone else, but cannot command the wage of a full time specialist. $150 to install a screen door is in the same league as a $75 dinner. If you are in that league, then $150 for the door is fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are 2 kinds of "handymen". The semi-homeless ones that show up on an old Schwinn 10 speed bike and may or may not return later and attempt to abduct your children, and the the guys who are actually trying to make a profession of it (advertising, insurance, vehicle, taxes, etc.) If your handyman was in the latter category - 150.00 sounds pretty reasonable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim R wrote:

Maybe more than two kinds since "Handyman" doesn't really mean much. To me it means a person working for himself. OTOH, there are companies that specialize in a variety of contract work and "handyman" is just part of the company name for a general contractor.
Still, I might take 2-1/2 hours or even longer to ponder my way through hanging a door if the opening was really out of square. But a person that has done it several times shouldn't take that long, no matter what he charges per hour. Heck, my father could have done it in less time even if he used only hand tools to make custom frame and molding from 8" wide stock.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What did you agree to pay before the job was done ? That works out to $ 60/hr.
No it doesnt seem "fair", in fact no "handyman" should be getting that rate but if you didnt specify in advance, he can ask for anything. Whether you pay it is up to you if theres no pre agreed price or contract, written or oral.
Would you walk into a store and buy something if you had no idea what the price was ? I dont think so.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Handyman - a person who does repairs for a specific hourly rate. If at any time, either party is dissatisfied, they can end the deal. Handymen should be licensed in their city/county where they are doing the work.
Contractor - a person who does specified repairs/construction for a preagreed price. If either party is dissatisfied, they can agree a compromise, or turn it over to the State Contractor's Board. A person who contracts is required to have a State Contractor's license.
This includes almost any work where anything permanent is attatched to a house or property.
If a person says, "I'll hang doors for $25 per hour," they are a handyman.
If a person says, "I'll hang two doors for $150, they are contracting," and depending on the state, may be committing a felony. In some states, even OFFERING to do specified work for a specified amount is contracting without a license.
I would request a price adjustment from the men who reamed you on the doors. If you don't get it, file a complaint with the proper authorities so that they are not allowed to run amok among the populace and do this to more people.
When hiring a handyman, if you don't know someone who is moral and honest, or can't find one through a referral from a friend, use handymen services. They cost more, but you are more confident you will get a qualified worker, and if there is a problem, you call them and they take care of it.
HTH
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Actually, I'd strongly advise you to always pay the bill first. This is likely a home improvement and as such the handyman is entitled to place a mechanics lien on your property and cloud the title and posssible even sell your property at a non-judicial foreclosure on the court house steps. So pay the bill and then complain bitterely to him and the powers that be such as the BBB, Attorney General, etc.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In my state, Nevada, the mere offer of doing a specific job for a specific price constitutes contracting, and is subject to all the laws EVEN IF THE JOB IS NEVER STARTED.

That would be an easy thing to handle. In the first place, they probably won't do that unless they are licensed and reputable and 100% in the right. In order for someone to sell your property, notice must be given, affadavits of mailings, all sorts of things. It is not as easy as you intone.

An inflated baloon has more force than the BBB. Now, the AG, or Contractor's Board is a different thing.

I do it all the time. And when price comes up, I still have the option to take it or refuse it.
STeve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Did you discuss price before the job?
If yes -- you agreed already. If not -- you shoulda.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
was it worth it to you?
personally, for 150$ i wouldnt want 'help'. i'd want to sit back and shout orders from a lawn chair with a cold beer in my hand.
as a side note, its funny to me how quick people (americans in particular) are to comment that someone else is 'overcharging' or 'making too much money' and how this makes them a jerk. yet i expect these same people, in the same situation with the roles reversed, would call themselves a genius for making so much money.
all things in this world are negotiable. if you dont know how to negotiate, thats YOUR problem.
america is going to bury itself alive just to prove it can handle a shovel.
randy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We didn't even ask the cost because the same man had stayed at the house an entire day doing something else and charged $100. Perhaps he felt he under-charged and wanted to make it up by charging $150 for a couple hours of work.

was
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would have questioned him about it at that point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.