Hand Pump on Deep Well

Page 2 of 2  
wrote:

many homes with wells have more than one well. a new well was drilled deeper in the past.
a ideal candidate for a hand pump looks all awesome and retro, and is a back up for no power or bad pump situations:)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I entirely agree, but I have occasional tragedies of this nature, mostly due to having the day job. Sometimes you just can't take off because of deadlines and meetings and other obligations so you pay the fee to have someone else do it.
Occasionally, I'll take off to fix something but sometimes I get caught in the cascading repair syndrome. You may have done this too. You're sure that Part A is causing the problem so you run up to the parts store and get a new Part A. After installation, the thing still doesn't work so you go back and get Part B. After installation, it still doesn't work but it's lunchtime. After lunch, you go back to buy Part C, which has to work because it's the only thing you haven't replaced yet. You finish as the Sun sets and push the start button; still no go. So you call the repairman and he comes out the next morning and fixes it for $497. Plus the wasted day and $200 in Parts A, B and C.
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, even paying plumber prices unless he had a long drive that fee was out of line. Should have taken way less that 30 minutes to replace the pressure switch. New pressure switches should be a standard part of the stuff in his truck. Disconnect three wires, unscrew old, screw on new, reconnect thee wires.
On personal stupidity. Last fall I had one replace the flush mechanism on the toilet (Toto so I was unfamiliar with the system) Turned out It was the usual simple replacement though. Then to compound the problem I asked him to look at a frostfree standpipe that would produce flow. Decided it needed replacement. He had his shovel on his shoulder headed for it when I came to my senses and realized I was about to pay plumber prices for sweat labor and stopped him. Replaced it myself the next day at an hours work.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Besides what others have said, there are spacers every so often attached to your piping and wiring that go down in the well to keep them from vibrating against the well casing. In other words, there isn't enough room to put more pipe or wires.
Forget it. It isn't worth the effort or expense.
Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <27a31eda-8d66-48c8-a0b7-

Deep well hand pumps are at the bottom of the well, operated by a rod that you work with a lever from the top of the well. They have a counterweight to balance the weight of the rod and part of the weight of the water column, so they aren't impossible to operate, but getting water by hand from that deep is a workout.
It would be much simpler and cheaper to install a plastic tank cistern, elevated enough to give you some gravity flow. Figure 200 gallons a day for family use, so a 2000 gallon tank would serve you for at least 10 days. You can buy a spun poly tank that size for around $600.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/13/2011 10:00 AM, Pavel314 wrote:

is pretty quick if you have the stuff ready. I don;t much care for a submersible under a house etc, It needs a seperaet well house, well made and insulated with switches and heaters and tall enough, if needed and spare pum, small hoist arrangement, and water filter system or softner.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A well house is the next to last place to install the equipment (under house is worst). You want that equipment where it is easily serviceable and protectedf rom freezing without additional heat. Put the pump controls, pressure tank and filters in the house if at all possible. I worked on these systems off and one for 50 years. Hated every one of those "crawl down into the well houise and try to find room to work" abortions.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, the dream well house of the person who has to work in one!!
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on the well house. My father in law built one that could be slid out of the way on a steel track. Before that he had one that tilted backwards out of the way.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And had he put the 'works' in the basement he could have saved all that expense...assuming he had a basement of course. Most reasonable size houses with no basement have sufficient room to install the 'works' in whatever is used for the laundry. Doesn't take much.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.