Hammerite

Anyone have any experience with this paint. You are supposed to be able to paint over rust with it.
R
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wrote:

buy you some time.
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On Oct 3, 9:18pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yes, it's great stuff. Knock off the loose rust and have at it.

Hammerite paint is designed to be applied to bare iron and steel, even rusty iron and steel, without primer. It only requires primer if you're using it on galvanized or aluminum.
R
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wrote:

Alas he is not putting it on "bare" iron, it is iron with a coat of rust. Rusty metal primer actually reclaims some of the metal and if you get all the loose rust off it will give you that bite through any remaining surface that you need to get into that "bare" iron.
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On Oct 4, 1:32 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Have you ever used Hammerite Rust Cap paint? I'm thinking no as the paint is a self-priming paint meant to be applied to bare steel and iron, and as I said earlier "even rusty iron and steel", without priming. The stuff itself IS a rusty metal primer.
Here's the priming info from the manufacturer - Kilz/Masterchem:
Priming Aluminum and galvanized surfaces require a prime coat of HAMMERITE® RUST CAP® GALVANIZED & ALUMINUM PRIMER.
So you don't need to prime first with the stuff. It's just a waste of time and money to do so.
And a little more from the manufacturer:
HAMMERITE® RUST CAP® HAMMERED ENAMEL FINISH is a self-priming, rust preventive coating designed to provide long-lasting metal protection. It provides a decorative finish that resists corrosion and the damaging effects from moisture and severe weather. Formulated for interior and exterior use.
Where to Use For use on metal substrates. Can be applied directly over firm, rusty surfaces. For previously painted surfaces, apply HAMMERITE® RUST CAP®
Surface Preparation†
Prepare surface by removing dirt, grease, wax, moisture, rust, loose paint and any other contamination that can affect the coating's adhesion. If washing is necessary, use a non-soapy detergent or TSP substitute. Rinse well and allow to dry. Scrape off loose paint and rust with a wire brush. Scuff sand rusted, glossy or hard surfaces.†
It's good stuff, and the hammered finish paint is attractive, durable and easy to touch-up. It's perfect for wrought iron railings, post lights, patio furniture, etc.
R
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On Tue, 04 Oct 2011 01:32:26 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

base metal. IIRC it has a lot of toluene in it -and pretty tough resins that stand up quite well. You don't want to put it on scaly rust though - knock the loose stuff off - and be sure the metal is not perforated that it can get water in under the paint. Goes without saying you don't want any moisture trapped in the rust. Most jobs I've seen done with it have a bit of a "texture" look - almost a hammertone or orange-peal look.
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On Oct 4, 8:03pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sounds like it would be perfect for one corner of my overhead garage door that is rusting where paint got rubbed off before I realized the door was rubbing against the stop before it gave the final closing surge downward. I'll have to look for the brand my next trip to the hardware stores.
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On Mon, 03 Oct 2011 20:29:09 -0400, ROANIN wrote:

It was pretty common when I lived in England - I did a few bits and pieces with it over the years and it held up well (but I suppose given different rules about chemicals in different countries, maybe it's not quite the same forumlation even though it's the same brand... hmm...)
cheers
Jules
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I used it to paint some parts on my dad's pickup truck ('73 Chevy) when we refurbed it back around 1991ish. Only thing that rusted again noticeably was one of the "steps" for the bed, but it was already well perforated at that time. When he had it painted again a few years ago I think he found a new step.
I've been using POR-15 and like it, the downside is that (probably similar to Hammerite) it's darn near impossible to paint over it unless you fog it with primer before it dries completely.
nate
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