Halogen under counter lights keep falling.. Need advice

These puck lights have no holes for screws and came with double sided tape. After about 15 minutes they start falling. I have cleaned off the old adhesive and tried again with the same results. Is there possibly a glue I could use that would take the heat? Thanks
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Gene wrote:

I am guessing that the problem is not the lights (although I think that tape for a heat producing product like this is dumb) rather I believe the problem is the surface under the cabinet which likely bare unfinished wood. Maybe if you would screw a square of say, Plexiglas that the tape could stick to under the cabinet it might work.
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Joseph Meehan

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The surface is smmoth - like the front of the cabinets - melanite (sp) ? On Thu, 26 May 2005 16:24:42 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

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Been there, done that, I once used similar lights, although not in the kitchen.
Chuck the lights. Even if you manage to get them mounted securely, the "pucks" will yellow and crack within 6 months.
When the bulbs burn out, and you twist the cover off to replace them, the cover will split/crack; assuming it hasn't already fallen off anyway.
Finally, these things radiate WAY too much heat out the back; they are a fire waiting to happen.
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Silicone RTV will take the heat it was used in WWII for seals on searchlights in the Artic.

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wrote:

Silicone RTV worked like a charm, thanks barbarow!! I used the high temp, over 700 degree stuff. What's great is that it is hidden, no metal plates showing ( as one poster suggested) and has held firm for weeks.
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Assuming you still want to use the lights after the other comments. Liquid nails should work. I have found it to stick relatively well (but not perfectly) to hard to stick plastics and is good for joining dissimilar materials with irregular surfaces. It will stand up moderately well to heat but I am not sure how long it will last with constant baking. Silicone RTV has lousy holding power but will not soften with heat

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Scrappimg the lights is not an option. It is my Grandmothers house and she is high lighting her crystal on two glass shelves, five deep. When the lights are on, it looks great, just don't keep them on. She doesn't keep them on all the time, just when company or such comes. Forget the burning out, she may use them 5 hours a week. On Thu, 26 May 2005 23:12:17 GMT, "AutoTracer"

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Gene wrote:

Scrap the ones you have and replace them with some good ones.

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The ones you have are not the only kind available. Home Depot, Lowe's, etc., carry dozens of varieties. Just handling and poking a couple of them will tell you which ones mount correctly (meaning "no stupid tape or adhesives"), and which ones will dissipate heat more readily.
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Gene wrote:

....
The best answer would probably be to replace them with some w/ actual mounting hardware as noted. An alternative besides the silicone that might work and be less permanent would be the adhesive-backed velcro pads.
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After reading the replies on this thread, I would NOT premanently glue them to the cabinet. If they die, you will never get them off. Glue them to a piece of wood or steel. Those flat steel plates you use on electrical octogon boxes comes to mind. (if they are big enough). After the glue dries, screw the metal or wood to the cabinet with 2 screws.

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Why halogen? I've heard too much about halogen lights catching fire. I admit I don't know the facts, but I just avoid halogen whenever I see it. (Educate me if I'm worng, please.)
                - = - Vasos-Peter John Panagiotopoulos II, Columbia'81+, Bio$trategist      BachMozart ReaganQuayle EvrytanoKastorian http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/vjp2/vasos.htm ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Fooey on GIU,Windows 4 Bimbos] [Cigar smoke belongs in veg food group]
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On Sat, 28 May 2005 04:29:24 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com

Halogen make more and whiter light per watt than do other incandescents.
Halogen last longer than other incandescents due to the tungsten-halogen cycle which redeposits vaporized tungsten back onto the filament.

What about gasoline (petrol) catching fire? Or tobacco? Or...
Halogen incandescent lights are hotter than "normal" incandescent, but both will cause ignition if mistreated. Approved fixtures are safe when used as intended, but some people just don't seem to understand that lights get hot.
Some people put halogen torchiers in and under draperies, and/or drape clothing or cloths or tissue over lamps, and/or put 100watt bulbs in fixtures rated only for 45w or 60w, and/or remove that "ugly, fuzzy, messy" insulation from the fixture, and/or overload outlets and extension cords, and/or run cords under rugs in traffic areas, and/or never clean out the clothes dryer ducting, and etc.
Fluorescent lights are about the lowest-heat producing lights we have, per light output. But they come with their own hazards, and thus are no panacea.
sdb
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So,t ake em apart, and make your own holes. Or use self drilling zip screws.
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