H2O heater pressure relief pipe joins AC condensate drain?

Just closed on a house on Friday.
While examining the AC condensate drain, I noticed that the pipe coming from the pressure relief valve on the hot water heater joins it. (Actually, it _used_ to join it; now that joint is completely loose.) The condensate drain pipe then travels another couple feet and drains into the pipe for the clothes washer drain.
Is that a good idea? Somehow I don't think so.
Also, the pipe they used coming off the relief value is PVC not copper. Is that good?
TIA,
S
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Condensate drain volume is relatively small and not under pressure so it may be OK if the joint is simply loose and not allowing condensate to drip on the floor.

If your building code allows it, there is no problem. Your City Building Inspector will know; give him a call. HTH
Joe
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No, it is not a good idea. The pipe on the pressure relief valve should be a single straight piece terminating about 6"-12" above the floor. Most plumbing codes do not allow additional fittings on it or piping it to a drain. If the valve operates, you want to be aware of it, as it is a sign of a problem.
Cheers, Wayne
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Wayne Whitney wrote:

Mine goes up to the attic, across, then down through a wall, and exits the house about a foot above ground level.
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I'd like to see _that_ code specification. The 6" bit is correct as a non-siphon termination is required, but it is recommended that all PRV's terminated in a safe drain, not on the floor. If you hear spashing on the floor you have two problems, what caused the valve to operate and what damage is all that water on the floor going to cause.
Harry K
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wrote:

Is there any technical sense to the term _safe_ drain?
I don't see a floor drain in that part of the basement. How likely is it that a PRV is going to operate and let out tons of water?
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It happens. They do stick open but the most common is a failure to close all the way with a constant leak until replaced. Mostly it is just a drip rather than a stream.
As for your installation: I can't see one being terminated in the AC drain line. The only ones I have seen are small diameter tubing that is not rated for hot water.
Harry K
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<snip>

Yeah, looking at it, it pretty much looks crazy. Though the AC condensate line setup is crazy too (I started a different thread on that). HVAC guy came in yesterday and redid it.

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