Guidelines for compressed air systems?

Are there any websites or FAQs that show a newbie how to design a compressed air delivery system? This is for a home-owner, not a garage or commercial application.
TIA,
HK
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I just used galvanized pipe to run it where I wanted it. Have the pipes slope slightly, with drains at the low spots for moisture removal. A section of pipe down with the drain at the bottom will act as a reservoir to hold the moisture between drainings. I used 1/2 inch pipe, and a short 1/2 inch pressure hose to connect the compressor to the pipe.
Bob
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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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skategoat25 wrote:

I used 1/2" copper pipe in my old garage, with soldered fittings. I used a piece of rubber air hose to connect to the compressor at first, but it kept bursting. I don't know why. So I used a piece of soft copper tubing, with a loop in it to absorb vibrations, and it worked great after that. I connected the tubing to the pipe with a gas valve and flare fittings.
Best regards, Bob
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Some years ago, a friend who I trust assured me that it is important not to connect directly to the air tank with rigid pipe. He says that some years ago someone had a lot of trouble with tanks blowing up (major problem) and they learned to use some kind of flex between the tank and the system.
Wish I could be more help th an that. The other fellow suggestion to look at Ingersol Rand sounds like a very good idea.
--
Christopher A. Young
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<< how to design a compressed air delivery system? >>
It's pretty simple, really. Next time you have your car serviced have a look at the air systems that the mechanics use and how they are piped around the shop. Or if you can wangle a tour of a small factory or machine shop, same thing applies. Keep in mind that many air compressors operate at 175 PSI in some cases, way over the ratings for piping like galvanized and plastic. Put drip legs with drain valves under each outlet, and duplex the outlets everywhere you can. Top notch flex connectors to the compressor can be had from Aeroquip via Graingers and others. Using 3/4" pipe is an advantage because it actually adds to the compressor storage capacity. And don't forget to put in a 1/4 turn ball valve before the piping so that if a air hose fai;s it won't make your compressor run all night (assuming you rememebr to turn it off when you leave). HTH
Joe
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Thanks for the feedback. With regard to putting in the valve before the piping, I can understand the logic but wouldn't it be just as easy to put the compressor on a switched outlet and simply turn that off when not working?

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Depends on how you look at it! I have a few small leaks in my piping, mostly the quick disconnects are leaking slightly. I leave the power turned on all the time, but shut off the valve at the tank outlet. If I shut off the power the tank probably would be empty the next day and I would have to wait for it to pump up. Shut off the air supply, and it is always full when I come out. There are no leaks in the tank, so with the valve off the compressor never runs. Greg
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Yes, that is good idea, unless your plumbing is air tight. The compressor will kick on in the middle of the night.
My idea is a timer, in that I usually only work for a few hours, and forget to shut off the compressor, until it wakes me up. Flip on xx number of hours of air, and forget about it.
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I was planning out my pipe runs last night and realize that I have to run through a finished ceiling area for about 35 feet. Unfortunately, I have to take a 90 degree turn in the middle of the run. That means to run any rigid piping, I have to take down some drywall. I can avoid that by running a flexible line. I know it's not ideal but can anyone think of safety or performance issues with running a high quality, 1/2 inch, rubber air hose through the cavity? I would put shut-off valves on both ends of the hose.
TIA,
HK
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skategoat25 wrote:

Can you just run the pipe diagonally?
I don't really see why a 90 degree bend would make much difference about taking down the ceiling. You gotta get the pipe up behind the ceiling anyway, and there will be at least one joint.
Bob
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To explain, I can get a straight pipe to the corner from both ends. I can access both ends from an unfinished part of the basement. If I take down a piece of ceiling drywall, I can solder a 90 degree elbow to join the two straight pieces. I know it sounds odd but this is a finished basement with some funny things going on with steel I-beams.

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Run copper tubing. A thin wall flex (it comes in a coil about 12-18"), which has 1/2" od, so it will solder into standard sweat fittings, which then couple to the air tools.
Insure that the run has no dips or sags, which may collect water.
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i use hard solder on copper if its on air like sil-philsus or i use %40 silver safemale
On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 23:40:22 -0500, "skategoat25"

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