Grounding Rod

Page 1 of 2  
Recently moving into an old house one of my main concerns was the electrical system.
One question I have is there a required size of cable for a 100 amp service?
When we first moved in I was looking at the service panel. I did not see a grounding cable to the outside. Which I know meant no grounding rod. What scared me the most is the grounding wire that was run went to the gas line. That for now was changed to the water line.
I would like to install the grounding rod myself but would like to know if it matters as to what size grounding cable to run for a 100 amp service.
Thanks,
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

#6 will work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
#6 copper for 100 amp service and two rods are required unless you have a ground meger to test a single rod

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

I assume you mean a rod for each phase? Why? And what good would a "ground meger" be? I assume again the you meant "megger"?
Just curious; I have NEVER seen more than one rod used for any entrance on any house.
Pop
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would have to assume you are just plain ignorant when it comes to electricity then.......

Yes, readily apparent that's what he had meant....
Curious...got any clues as to how a megger might work ???
( this oughta be good )

In my area, with any new service two ground rods are required, and so far as I know there are no exceptions allowed whatsoever.
--
SVL








Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So I can't spell!! You are correct that only one is required but it must have a specific ground resistance, which you need the megger to test. If you don't have one, you must install a second rod six feet apart

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hey Poop, lighten up!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My 100 amp service required 2 ground rods, 8' apart on a continuous #6 conductor. But only because I do not have a metal water main going out that could also be grounded, mine is pvc.
Ed

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oscar_Lives wrote:

Why? I have a 200 amp service and a single rod. The critical factor, at least here, is the length of the rod and depth the rod is driven down.
And, what the hell is a ground meger? Did he mean a ground meter? If so, what is a ground meter? Did he mean measure the ground with an Ohm meter?
And the response is equally crazy. "A rod on each phase" means the questioner doesn't know anything about electricity or the correct terms. And he things meger might be megger, but what the heck is megger?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Let me splain it: NEC rules change constantly. There was a time when, if you had a metal water pipe, it was sufficient for grounding. Next it was required to back the water pipe up with a ground rod. If you had a well with pvc you needed two ground rods. The latest change is that you must determine how well connected to the earth your ground rod is, which is done using an expensive measuring device called a megger. If you don't have one many jurisdictions require you to add an additional rod. IMHO it makes sense. If you drove an eight foot ground rod into dry sand it probably isn't going to have any connection electrically with earth

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

it
FDR, did your mother have any normal children?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, looks like your mother didn't rear any smart children.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok it is called a megger. Bet that is just slang for the name--megger is probably a corruption of the brand or megohm something. What is the real name?
RBM wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George E. Cawthon wrote:

http://www.tpub.com/doeelecsciehttp://www.tpub.com/doeelecscience/electricalscience2172.htmnce/electricalscience2172.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
joe wrote:

http://www.tpub.com/doeelecsciehttp://www.tpub.com/doeelecscience/electricalscience2172.htmnce/electricalscience2172.htm

oops, don't know how that happened, meant to paste this link.
http://www.tpub.com/doeelecscience/electricalscience2172.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

.... I think the name actually dates back to WWII or maybe even earlier. A "Megger" measures Meghohms, and thus the name for its use as in "megging a line". I used them a lot in the service to look for insulation breakdowns in aircraft wiring. You apply the megger, which was basically a high voltage generator, crank it up, and measure the voltage at which current flows, and then the current, and the readout would in meghohms. It was a tiny scale, very hard to read, and you usually got to use it in the mid day tropical sun, inside a hell hole somwhere in one of the aircraft fuselage.
Just for grins, I jumped onto Google and the first place I tried turned up one very similar to the ones we had: http://physics.kenyon.edu/EarlyApparatus/Electrical_Measurements/Megger/Megger.html
Megger is the actual name of the instrument: try a search on Google and you'll find lots of hits for "megger". They've taken a much more modern design and application of course, but the concept of all of them seems to be the same: measuring current flow at specified voltages and reading out the reults, in resistance or impedance, whichever the case may be.
It was a surprise to me to see a megger used for ground rod testing, but I did see a couple of links for that purpose too, though I didn't open them. I would have thought it more of a high current test, but apparently not, which I can sort of see, because the two opposing phases coming into a building each add or subtract for total current, depending on the phase, but I can't argue with facts, eh? Earth grounds are "interesting' to say the least.
HTH,
Pop
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1
On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 18:35:12 -0400, "Pop"
I'd hate to think of terror measures
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: PGP 7.1
iQA/AwUBQuGAGgIk7T39FC4ZEQKaqwCfVeunk+Sh2IMplq5HcCYEq8gFQ5UAoKO+ VMlI5bx8bBPUPis5qVV/t2TL =/OWX -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
--
-john
wide-open at throttle dot info
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pop wrote:

http://physics.kenyon.edu/EarlyApparatus/Electrical_Measurements/Megger/Megger.html
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought municipal power was 3 phase?
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.