Grounding Metal Building

I erected a 30 x 24 foot metal building and I've read somewhere that it may need to be grounded. If so, how would I go about this.
Thanks in advance....
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Your building inspector will have the specifications for your town. In general, it is driving a grounding stake into the earth and wiring it to the building.
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Ray wrote:

well? What is the foundation for the building and is it steel reinforced with reinforcing bars? Were is the building located? I don't want the street address but I need the state in order to gage the lightning exposure.
Under the US NEC the metal frame of the building must be bonded to the grounded current carrying conductor of the electrical service that most of us call the neutral. If the building has a metal frame that is bolted to a concrete foundation it may be grounded already by the reinforcing steel in the footing. If the footer does not contain any rebar and the frame is therefore not effectively grounded then a three foot trench should be dug around the entire periphery of the building to permit installation of a ground ring. A ground ring is a number two American Wire Gage or larger conductor that is buried around a building at a depth of at least thirty inches. Best practice is to bury it below the permanent moisture level. From the ground ring a Grounding Electrode Conductor would be run to the service disconnecting means enclosure as well as to each major column of the frame of the building. If the permanent moisture level is well below the surface of the earth then sectional ground rods should be driven at each corner of the building to below the permanent moisture level if the building is in a lightning prone area. These rods would then be bonded to the ground ring. -- Tom H
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wrote:

Good Post, I've noticed many people use the word 'grounded' and 'bonded' the same when they are actually different.
thanks,
tom @ www.BookmarkAdmin.com
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Tom H,
I live in South Louisiana and the building is metal framed and skinned with the frames being bolted to anchor bolts that were placed in the concrete slab. Rebar was used in the footer perimeter. (Would the anchor bolts need to be touching the rebar to be considered grounded as per your explanation ??)
If I satisfy the grounding requirements, does that mean that I will still need to "bond" the building to the ground rod ?? Could you explain how to bond to the frames ??
Thanks, Ray

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I don't know how fancy you want to get. I built a couple of buildings for a major gas pumping outfit here. They required the full ground ring around the perimeter buried 4' minimum with a grounding stinger cad welded to the building ring and to each column. Cad welding is explained here: http://www.erico.com/products.asp?folderid 8 but is basically a molten metal connection that uses powdered copper oxide and aluminum that is ignited. Your electrician should be familiar with the system.
These things can be accomplished with mechanical fasteners.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Depending on how you constructed the foundation the building might be considered grounded now. Electrical circuits excluded.
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