Grounding An Appliance Help Needed

I had written this post in another way but I think I confused some people. I was wiring a plug cord into a dishwasher and the ground on the splice box was a cup (stake?) with notches around the side and a hex nut going through it into the box. I was told that this is for stranded wire. I just stuck the tinned stranded ground wire through the notch to the other side of the cup and cinched it down. I hope I am not required to also wrap around the ground nut and then stick the conductor back around through the notch under the cup. I will have to redo it! I will not have access to this dishwasher and just want to make sure I did it safely. Thanks and sorry for the long
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All wires must be installed so that they maintain good contact before the 'cinching' device is applied. For example, all wires inside the electrical box must be twisted together so that they maintain full connection without the wire nut. Only then is the wire nut installed.
Wire is attached and maintains connection to receptacle or switch screw by fully wrapping wire around screw. Only then is screw tightened.
Same with the stranded wire attached to that cup. First stranded wire is twisted, then wrapped around screw so that wire maintains full contact without screw being tightened. Only then is screw tightened on that wire.
This is considered good wiring technique for copper wire. This was considered absolutely essential and necessary if using aluminum wire so that the wire junction does not kill humans. What is necessary for aluminum wire is also considered standard procedure using copper wire. Wrap that stranded wire fully (clockwise) around the screw and inside shoulder washer so that copper wire maintains connection - does not fall out. Only then is screw turned (clockwise) to clamp down on stranded wire inside that washer.
Michael Roback wrote:

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Best with stranded wire to get a loop crimp sleeve. Twist the strands, insert into the crimp sleeve, crimp with a proper crimping tool, then put the screw through the loop and tighten.
A one-wrap of stranded wire is not good. The mechanical strength (in that small of wire) is not there to maintain a good connection, should the screw come loose. And, if you wrap it more than once, the chances of the strands being pinched in two when you tighten the screw becomes more likely.
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Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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