Grounding a Plumbing Drain Pipe

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The building inspector came over yesterday and said that most of my remodeling looked fine. However he said that I must ground the drain pipe where it exits the house before going to the septic tank. I questioned how to do this, and he said to drive two ground rods at least ten feet apart, connect them together with #6 bare cable, using ground rod clamps, and connect the cable to the pipe with an approved clamp. I have called every electrical and plumbing supply store in the area and no one sells an approved clamp for 4 inch schedule 40 PVC pipe. When I called the inspector and asked him where to get the clamp, he got real rude and said it is not his job to do my shopping and suggested using the internet. I am not finding anything online either. Where can I get one? (He said I can NOT use a large hose clamp, which I suggested).
Bob
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On Jun 25, 1:36 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo-nospam.com wrote:

Is drain metal or pvc, plastic pipe does not conduct electricity, you cant ground Pvc.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo-nospam.com wrote:

This makes absolutely no sense.
Grounding is for electrical systems, not plumbing. Electrical ground used to be required to be tied to _SERVICE_ water entrance as it used to be it was always metal, but even that isn't so any longer, necessarily.
I'd call the building permit office and request the supervisory person to clarify the actual requirement and code section supposedly in violation.
--
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dpb wrote:
...

Check out 2005 NEC 250.4(a)(4) and 250.104(a)(1). You need to ground your metallic plumbing.
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M Q wrote:

This is PVC according to OP, which last time I checked wasn't metallic...
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo-nospam.com wrote:

He wanted you to ground a PVC pipe? You may want to ask him what section of the electrical code requires PVC (or other non-metallic) pipes to be grounded. Then call his boss and have a laugh together.
Now if it was a metallic pipe, you probably want it connected to the rest of the building ground system, which may already includes ground rods, not its own separate ground rods.
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I am guessing only the electric panel needs a ground rod. A steel pipe water supply is the best ground and ground can be tied to that as well, but grounding concrete or PVC drain will do absolutely nothing.
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"I am guessing only the electric panel needs a ground rod. A steel pipe water supply is the best ground and ground can be tied to that as well, but grounding concrete or PVC drain will do absolutely nothing."
I would tend to agree that in most places metalic water pipes are a DAMN good ground. But they are no longer acceptable is the "official" gorunding method. For that, it's two ground rods. If you have a water pipe, the ground rods are for show. You bond the water pipe to your ground rod system and that's as good as you can get (just about, anyway ... bonding the a re-bar system in concrete is consider to be quite good also.
Obvious, a PVC pipe can't be a ground.
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On Jun 25, 2:36 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo-nospam.com wrote:

The problem is, you can't ground plastic pipe with metal wire. If your county approves stranded wire, you can get away with using some nylon rope. Otherwise, a fishing store should have some solid nylon wire that'll do the trick. A big plastic zip-tie can hold it all together since then you'll have similar materials for everything.
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The Reverend Natural Light wrote:

Give the man a seegar! The Rev's solution is perfect for the original troll's problem <g>
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Yup, TROLL!
wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo-nospam.com wrote:

Either you're a troll... or the inspector is an ass. Ask him to cite what provision of what code requires grounding a PLASTIC pipe.
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On Thu, 26 Jun 2008 00:58:24 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

And why you should use a separate grounding electrode that is not bonded to the main.
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I'd demand a citation in the building code or plumbing code that requires this. He won't be able to cite it, i'll bet.
s

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on a related note a large chunk of my drains were replaced with PVC, in the center. this leaves a ungrounded vent at roof level.
is this a hazard?
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The wording in the NEC says "any piping that COULD become energized". I'd reckon this leaves out most drain pipes even if they were metal.
s

on a related note a large chunk of my drains were replaced with PVC, in the center. this leaves a ungrounded vent at roof level.
is this a hazard?
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On Jun 26, 5:48�am, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

yeah this new question now fascinates me, if for no other reason than curosity. have lived here since 1972 and havent been struck....
wish I had thought about this before sealing up the walls.
it was a major project.
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1. PVC pipe doesn't conduct electricity, so you cannot ground it.
2. Plumbing is not grounded to protect the plumbing, it's to offer more grounding for the electrical system in addition to the two copper ground rods.
3. Grounding can be accomplished in a variety of ways, including ground rods, underground metal piping, buried metal plates, or tying into the metal rebar of the foundation. Any and all grounds available should be tied together electrically to prevent voltage differential between them (i.e. connect the ground rods, metal cold water pipes exiting the building, telephone grounding, etc.)
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HerHusband wrote:

It's like eating candles; you don't actually know until you try.

No, grounding of the plumbing is done to protect humans. But it is the plumbing that is connected to ground, not the electrical system being grounded through the plumbing.

You don't ground electrical stuff by connecting it to a water pipe; you ground the water pipe by connecting it to the electrical ground (one way or another). The technique is the same, but the rationale differs.
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well a ungrounded metal drain line can be a real hazard, imagine a drain line running along a electrical line, they omehow touch and rb from vibration.
over ime the power line powers the drain line, without a ground a kid ouches any part of the electrical drain system and get killed.
if drain line had been grounded a breaker would of tripped, the fault found and fixed.
as a child i found our doorbell wire crossing a gas line.
wierd bell ringing every time the hot water tank turned on. most inconvenient.
at 11 years old it was a exciting find and repair fix:)
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