ground wire on siemens panel

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I have a siemens panel, and I got some #4 stranded copper wire to connect to the ground rods, and water pipes. But when I go to connect it to the ground/neutral bar, it is too big(just a little too big) to fit in the slots. Is there another peice that is supposed to be for this, or do I need to go back and get solid #4 for the ground wire (and will solid #4 fit).
Thanks!
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I'm pretty sure, if you don't distort the end of the wire it should just fit in the terminals, but you can always pick up a ground detail from a supply

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Ed wrote:

You can divide the strands into two bundles (like a Y) and connect in two adjacent slots if you need to.
Pete C.
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Pete C. wrote:

No competent electrical inspector will ever except that. Buy the correct lug and install it.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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"Tom Horne, Electrician" wrote:

Bullshit!
There is no reduction in current capacity and there is no safety issue. There certainly would be an issue if you trimmed of a few strands to fit an undersized hole, but in this case you are maintaining the full capacity of the wire.
Pete C.
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wrote:

Isn't there a minimum size wire before you are allowed to parallel conductors?
tom
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Tom The Great wrote:

It's not parallel conductors, it's a spread termination.
Pete C.
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wrote:

It may work but it is still a violation. 110.3(B) if nothing else
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Care to explain that? The listed equipment (the panel) is being used as specified with a conductor of a gauge within the specified range terminated in each neutral / ground bar position.
Pete C.
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wrote:

If all that is true it should fit in a single hole.
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On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 23:03:26 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Might also be a 110.12 violation, depending on the AHJ.
later,
tom
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Tom The Great wrote:

Exactly which part of 110.12? The first part? Part A, B, C?
Pete C.
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wrote:

No specific part, just 110.12.
tom
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Pete C. wrote:

Your opinion that it is BS does not change the fact that no competent electrical inspector will sign off on such an installation. The US NEC requires that equipment be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling. The UL white book contains the listings and the sizes of wire that each listed terminal are tested to terminate. You're wilderness engineering solution will not pass inspection.
--
Tom Horne

Well we aren\'t no thin blue heroes and yet we aren\'t no blackguards to.
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"Thomas D. Horne, FF EMT" wrote:

Please tell me exactly which of the instructions included with the listed panel a spread termination will violate? It certainly will not violate the neutral / ground terminals specified wire gauge range as each terminal will be terminating a wire strand bundle matching it's rated gauge range.
Pete C.
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Pete C. wrote:

Nice try Pete. Your split strands don't have a gage. Upon request you have to present the listing mark or label and there is no listing mark or label for the divided strands. It is simply a damaged conductor.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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"Tom Horne, Electrician" wrote:

Nice try, unless a strand has been severed, it is *not* a damaged conductor any more than it would be a damaged conductor being squished under the terminal screw. Indeed I've seen terminal screws nearly sever strands.
Pete C.
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Pete C. wrote:

I agree with gfretwell, Tom and Thomas. Is a violation of 110.3-B and could be called under 110.12.
bud--
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wrote:

Pete says he doesn't have an inspector to make happy where he is and this is not particularly dangerous. It is not worth arguing about. Just be aware there are inspectors who will tag it.
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Thomas D. Horne, FF EMT wrote:

Why not just /ask/ the local code inspector if it would be OK to separate the strands and use 2 adjacent terminals, or if you need to buy an add-on lug? They both seem perfectly reasonable solutions to me if done neatly. Separating the strands has the advantage of one less connection. The add-on lug would probably look a little better.
Or are you two just having fun pissing on each other? ;-)
Bob
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