Ground bees

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Just discovered today a single nest of ground bees in my lawn. Appearance wise they look much like smaller bumble bees.
Would like some recommendations on what to treat the nest with before they send out invitations to all their relatives.
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Jim wrote:

Unless they are aggressive (bumble bees are not) and/or causing you some problem, just leave them alone.
They're great pollinators and bees are having a heckuva time now with colony collapse disorder and such.
I've got a borage plant in the corner of my lawn that bumble bees just love and I have no trouble mowing around it when there are numerous bumble bees on it -- they're slow and mellow bees. They don't get the name "bumble" for nothing.
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"Ermalina" wrote:

I had some a number of years back in my backyard. Didn't bother anything until I mowed over them, at which time I got six good sized wallops about my face before I made it back into the house. Didn't even go back out to turn off the mower, just let it run until it was dry.
I went out the next night with the garden hose and a pint of very soapy water. Threw the soap in first as a "wetting agent" and then pushed in the garden hose.
Went to bed leaving the water running, and woke up to a puddle and no more beehive.
Jon
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Jon Danniken wrote:

If they are hornets, they can be very dangerous to anyone walking or mowing nearby .. hornets give chase and a child or elderly person can get major numbers of stings from hornets.
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Jon Danniken wrote:

I'll try a variation on that. I have a "gun" style hose attachment for washing the car. As sunset approaches I'll set it on the soapy solution and stick the wand down the hole. Sometime later I'll follow that up with just water.
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On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 03:59:38 +0000, Ermalina wrote:

Sometimes you'll come across a bumble bee crawling along the ground on a cool morning when there's lots of dew on the grass. Bumble bees aren't very good at 'cold starts' and need the heat of the sun to get the old circulation going so they can take off.
There's nothing more satisfying than picking it up and breathing on it a few times then watching it take off from the palm of your hand to start another busy day at work.
I LOVE bumble bees :-)
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Jim wrote:

Could be yellow jackets. I hit nest opening with hornet/wasp knockdown spray then pour in a gallon of malathion mix and finally put some dirt over hole.
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Frank wrote:

I've got a lifetime of experience with yellow jackets. These are different.
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Greetings,
Id like to ask about some ground bees that I have. I found them on the south west side of my hous. The sunny, hot side. I live in the Northeast. I was drilling a hole in the side of my house and one flew up my pants and stug me on the leg. The sting was not terrilbly bad but lasted a week. Here is what I can tell you about the bees. They are smaller than a bumble bee, black and white (no yellow), they are not terribly aggressive. The (had) one hole in the ground directly against my foundation. There is lots of activity around the entrance. I have dones some searching and came up with a few possible solutions,l but with les than great results. The first night, I went out after dark. It was rather cold (60 degrees). I was able to zap the entrance with RAID wasp and hornet spray, then I poured 3 gallons of a mixture of hot water with lots of dish soap, and also mixed with a few tablespoons of 20 year old SEVIN liquid. The bee activity continued for 3 days, and then they moved about 5 feet away along the foundation and resumed their activity. I repeated my treatment, and they moved about a foot away. I repeated it again, anad they didn't even move. I called the local extension service and they told me to go to an agriculture type store and have them recommend a treatment. I went to my local Agway and they recommended BAYER ant killer. (It also kills 29 other types of insects). I applied this last night, watered it in, and I still have bee activity 24 hours later. Not only that, there is a new small entrance where the original one was several days ago. I am hoping for a 48-72 hour kill. I am not holding my breath.
Truthfully I am not sure what type of bee I am dealing with. I have looked on several ID pages and cant seem to find it. I am hoping to gather a dead one and bring it in to photgraph it, and send it off. They are very fast fliers and highly maneuverable. They are smaller than bumble bees, black and white, and are somewhat furry. Not as much fur as a bumble bee, and they don't hover near plants or grass. They fly off real fast and return real fast. I tried digging up the area directly around their entrance, and I found nothing underneath. That is when I sprinkled the BAYER ant killer on and wateredit in. Yet the next day there were new entrance holes in the same dirt I turned over.
If anyone has any suggestions on identifying them, or getting rid of them I would be very grateful. Thanks
Paul.../NH
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Can you just leave them alone now that you know where they are?
If not, use an insecticide *dust*, and sprinkle a little at the entrance hole. You don't want anything too fast acting; 10% Sevin dust would be good. It won't take much. They will get in on their feet and track it inside and poison the whole nest.
Bob
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SEVIN!!!!! Yikes. Tht's the same agent used in some nerve gases eh????
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on 8/26/2007 8:01 AM terry said the following:

Close, but no cigar! SERIN is the nerve gas.
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willshak wrote:

Closer, but still not quite there...
"Sarin"
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on 8/26/2007 10:07 AM dpb said the following:

OK, but I think I get SEVEN chances to get it right. :-) I know I can dismiss SARAN.
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willshak wrote:

...
Only if you can do w/o the wrap... :)
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on 8/26/2007 10:35 AM dpb said the following:

OK, I found out that I was right the first time. SERIN is a small yellow and grayish Old World finch (/Serinus serinus/ of the family Fringillidae) that is related to the canary, whose protection when endangered, is a fart that affects the nerves of the attacker. True. I read it on the internet. :-)
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terry wrote:

No, that's "Sarin".
Bob
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Are they really causing a problem? Is it really necessary to kill them off? Shortages of healthy bees are causing pollination problems in both North America and Europe. As result crops are not reproducing as fully and some say cost of some foods may increase due to shortages! BTW even wasps do a good job of reducing the mosquito population. As humans we seem to feel that the moment we see any insect we must attack it with all kinds of chemicals. Chemicals that may later get into the human food chain, water supplies etc. And darn it; just as I type this a large mayfly dances up on the lighted monitor screen! Maybe in the morning I'll feed it to one of my friendly spiders outside?
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wrote:

(snip)
Hey, they started it! :^/
Not disagreeing with you in principle. But when they attack me when I'm mowing the lawn (multiple stings, hurt like hell for over a day), and when skunks or whatever leave big holes in lawn from digging up the hives for the honey, well, yeah, they gotta go. There is plenty of non-groomed land within a one-mile circle, where they can nest away unmolested. They are even welcome to the far corner of the backyard, where I pile the branches and leaves and such, to create a good spot for the rabbits and such to make burrows over the winter.
aem sends....
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Thanks for the replies.
Ordinarily, I wouldn't be concerned and would just let them be. But the problem is that I am installing a new heating system and I have to work on that side of the house for several days to modify the chimney, and install a set of propane tanks and a gas line. The bees feel threatened when I am working anywhere near the area, and start to become more aggressive. I have already been stung a couple of times, and it makes working over there very difficult. If I can narrow the entrance down to just one or two earas, I will try the glass bowl idea.
Thanks for the advice and suggestions.
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