grinders bite

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A few days ago, I bought the first sanding disc for my high rpm Makita 4" grinder that I had bought in ten years. Just don't do that much fine finish work.
I have done hundreds of hours of using a grinder. I know the kick spots. But I had it grinding in the 9 o/clock position of the wheel and KICK! Went flying, and sliced the top of my left hand. Nice 2.5 inch incision, half deep, half just along the fat line, and not down into the meat. Nice little white things in there looking like cotton line, but didn't cut any. Lots of flowing blood, as I am on coumadin.
Wrapped a compressed bandage on it from my huge first aid kit, and went and got nine stitches.
Came home and continued working.
Same damn thing happens again, only this time, I have hold of the grinder near the back end, and not choked up, as the first time. I had thought of this during the time I was getting all poked with Novocain and sutures. Grinder went flying through the air, missing everything except the workpiece, table, and floor. Contacted no organic material that time. Still caused by the 9 o'clock point of contact. Think I learned something, even if it is to use air to finish sand instead of 14k rpm grinders.
Crap, that would have been a difficult thing to explain to SWMBO.
Anyway, watch the kick points on your grinding and sanding blades.
Damn, those things happen in a hurry.
Doctor said that if he had to draw a line on the back of my hand for surgery, it would be right along where I had opened it up. Missed everything but skin, fat, and a little meat. Probably feel better when it quits hurting, too. Stitches for ten days, that's the aggravating part.
It's always something.
Steve
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Glad you got lucky and avoided permanent damage. However the fact you got two kickbacks in a row with total loss of control shows you have dangerous work habits.
Were you using a two hand grip with a side handle?
Did you have a guard fitted?
Light grinding with a disk edge doesn't need the side handle, but any procedure with a large contact surface such as deep cutting or sanding risks torquing the grinder out of your hands.
Do us a big favour and *NEVER* buy a wood carving blade for your grinder . . . . ;-)
--
Ian Malcolm. London, ENGLAND. (NEWSGROUP REPLY PREFERRED)
ianm[at]the[dash]malcolms[dot]freeserve[dot]co[dot]uk
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wrote:

have got you on the hand.... it would have taken a bite out of your forearm :-)
Seriously though, I've discovered that a good pair of leather work gloves is a lot stouter then human skin.
--
Cheers,
John B.
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On 10/30/2012 7:36 AM, John B. wrote:

I've got three pairs of Kevlar gloves which I use when doing something where there is a chance of injury. Used them the other day to cut up a deer. Keep one pair in with my chain saw.
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On 10/30/2012 06:30 AM, Frank wrote:

I first read that as using your chainsaw to process a deer. o.0
Jon
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Nah... we use those for Razorbacks.
Lloyd
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On 10/30/2012 1:09 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:

Would have made a mess. I did try a reciprocating saw once to make the quartering backbone cut but that did not work. Used to use a wood saw but now have a bone saw. Still a chore.
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On Tue, 30 Oct 2012 14:22:55 -0400, Frank

If you just want the ribs, we use a cleaned pruning shear. Quick and easy.
Pete Keillor
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On Tue, 30 Oct 2012 10:09:04 -0700, Jon Danniken

Lots of folks use chainsaws to process deer and cattle.
Gunner
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You're not very smart.
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On Tue, 30 Oct 2012 09:30:57 -0400, Frank

I thought that chain mail gloves were de rigueur for knife projects. http://www.scobiesdirect.com/Products.asp?ProdCat=Chain+Mail+Gloves+%2FAprons
--
Cheers,
John B.
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wrote:

Apparently not...

I've done hundreds of hours with side grinders with rubber pads and flexible discs. They're fairly safe even one-handed without a guard so long as you're careful not to ding the disc edge on a material edge. If a material edge nicks the disc edge then you tend to get a moderate kick. If you're dumb enough to try for round two with the existing nick then expect a really nasty kick next time that nick gets near an material edge. If you're doing stuff like this while on rat poison then I hope you're not expecting taxpayers to pick up the cost of the emergency room visits. But I'm guessing you care even less about that part than proving you're a careless amateur.
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Steve,

Sorry to hear about your accidents, and thankful you didn't get hurt worse.
All power tools carry a certain amount of risk. Heck, I've hurt myself with a random orbit sander by accidentally sanding my knuckle, and even a drill smacked my arm hard enough to bruise when I hit a knot with a 2" auger bit. For that matter, I've hurt myself with handheld tools like handsaws and chisels. In virtually every case I've looked back and thought "that was a dumb thing to do".
The number one rule is to pay attention. I try to use all the guards and safety features available for my tools, and keep my hands away from the business end of the tools. Still, it only take a brief moment of carelessness to do something stupid, even with years of experience.
As for the 4" grinder, I never use mine without a firm grip on the grinder and my other hand firmly holding the auxiliary handle. I have had a couple kicks over the years but with both hands holding on firmly there was no harm to me, the tool, or the workpiece.
You will never eliminate risk with power tools, but you can greatly reduce injuries by paying attention, thinking through each step, using the guards and handles on your power tools, and practicing safe habits (no one handed grinding... :) ).
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com
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On Tue, 30 Oct 2012 14:16:26 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

Someone who doesnt toss the side handle on a 4" grinder in the trash on opening the box?
Fascinating!
Gunner, who has no side handles on any grinder smaller than 6" and no grinders with guards still attached. And only (1) ding in 40 yrs of grinding weldments.
-- "
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As I recall, "Before we use any power tools, let's take a moment to talk about shop safety. Be sure to read, understand, and follow all the safety rules that come with your power tools. Knowing how to use your power tools properly will greatly reduce the risk of personal injury. And remember this: there is no more important safety rule than to wear these safety glasses"
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On Tuesday, October 30, 2012 4:21:36 PM UTC-4, rlz wrote:

The manual that came with my chain saw wanted me to wear: A full face shield. Boots. Gloves. A helmet. Leather jacket and pants.
I live in Miami...
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Gunner wrote:

I use the handle on one of the 4" all the time. It's loaded with a wire wheel that likes to grab.
Both of the polishes were them as well. One is a 3" and the other 9" On them the handle lets me feel when they are flat on the surface.
--
Steve W.

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clipped

Shoot, glad you didn't do worse :o( I was just thinking yesterday about grinders and other power tools. Just bought a house, wondering what needs (very little) or I want to be done...one ambition having a basement workshop, building half-size furniture. Hmm, what power tools would I need....table saw pretty scary, not ever used any power tools that can amputate or kill. Retired nurse, mind wanders to all of the things that can hurt/kill people unexpectedly. Friend's dad retired, set up new workshop, cut off four fingers. Remembered story in Florida paper 'bout fellow using a grinder, wheel broke, pieces flew and cut his carotid artery. Get face shield (and a freaking chest protector?) if I ever use power stuff? Might stick to needlework and gardening. The house comes with a koi pond and six koi.
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So, Steve ignores the kick point. Hurts himself.
And, then, goes back and does it all again. Some people should not own tools.
Obama care would probably cover this all, for no charge to Steve.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Maybe, but they would just take off the hand so he couldn't do it again. o care just isn't worth the costs or risks.
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