Green Drywall on Ceiling

It is my understanding that "green" water-resistant drywall should not be used on the ceiling because it will sag.
It is also my understanding that green drywall differs from regular drywall only in the paper covering.
So... why will green drywall sag more than regular?
*moc
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really?
Think I'd have to disagree.

Could it be your understanding is incorrect?
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Clearly. That's why I posted.
Thanks for your illuminating reply, Farmer Not So Helpful.
Maybe someone else will help out.
*moc
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In article

After posting, I found a reference to the fact that the "green" drywall core is indeed treated to be water resistant (as opposed to my previous reading which stated that just the paper was resistant).
I now have this explanation:
"For ceiling applications, green board requires extra support. According to Gypsum Association guidelines, green board in a ceiling application needs 12" o.c. support. If supports are 16" o.c., 5/8" green board should be used. Why is this additional support needed? Moisture repellents, such as the asphalt and wax emulsions in the green board core formulation, act as lubricants. These lubricants cause the gypsum crystals to slip easily, resulting in board sag For bathroom ceiling applications, we recommend regular or Type X board. Simply apply a good quality sealer and two coats of latex based paint after installation."
So to redirect the thread: would anyone with experience care to give their opinion on the suitability or necessity of green board on a ceiling?
Thanks, *moc
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OK, that's the manufacturer's opinion on the suitability or necessity of green board on a ceiling...

What, the manufacturer doesn't have enough experience to suit you? Do you have a reason to suppose that the opinion of some stranger on Usenet is worth more than theirs?
Bottom line: you already have your answer. If you want to put greenboard on your ceiling anyway, nobody's stopping you. I'll tell you one thing, though, that the manufacturer didn't: greenboard is a *lot* heavier than regular drywall. I don't see any point in making the job of drywalling a ceiling any more difficult than it already is.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I did a poor job of quoting. The first two paragraphs, suggesting using 12" oc support for green board on the ceiling (and the explanation) was from the Gypsum Association guidelines. The third paragraph (recommending regular or type x) was an addition from the website from which I pulled the quote. That's why I was looking for more opinions.
That was bad form on my part, and I apologize.
Thanks for your answer.
*moc
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To my knowledge, the gypsym core in green drywall has a chemical in that makes it more resistant to water saturation, this also makes the board less stiff. To prevent sagging in ceilings a common solution is to "strap" the ceiling with 1x3 firring at 12 inck centers and then install greenboard Todd

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