gravel parking space

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Hi,
I'd like to build a small parking lot in my backyard without any roof or walls, just to park my car there. I think the cheapest solution would be a "do-it-yourself"gravel parking spot. Does anybody know what is required for such project? I suspect it's more than just ordering and spreading gravel there.
Do I have to build any foundation for that ?... etc...
Any answers or suggestions will be apprecaited.
Thank you,
Vadim
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http://www.tremron.com/home_owners/erosion_turf.html
There's a local plant near me that manufactures that type. A local mason supply can order them for you. They're fairly cheap and easy to put down.
R
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Why not just park on the grass. If you ever kill the grass and it gets muddy, then you can add the gravel.

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Why wait? Shouldn't be too long before the grass is dead.
R
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Rico, Rico, Rico. You missed the answer I was waiting for from you -- you've been in the big city for too long.
The correct answer is: First, find out where your septic tank is.
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Ummm, why would my septic tank have anything to do with the OP's parking situation...? :)~
R
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gravel driveways always get muddy, no matter what you do. I added 500 bucks worth of new gravel to a 65 foot driveway within 2 years mud.
proobably overkill for this poster but a neighbor had a mud free driveway.
he had it dug out with bulldozed a foot down, had a cheap layer of asphalt laid, then added a foot of gravel. 15 years and zero mud. no extra grravel needed.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Cheaper than laying asphalt under it, use good quality landscaping fabric under the gravel. (Don't cheap out with too little gravel, or the fabric will get exposed in patches and you'll get mud where it wears through.)
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Not if they re put in properly. The house I built in 1998 still just has gravel in the 100 ft driveway..NO MUD
Place we re in now..2004 to date..no mud
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It has to do with putting down a proper base of AB3 or crush and run. I'll bet that's what you did, right?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It has to be installed properly. It was probably done by just dumping gravel and spreading it. If the soil underneath is poor then there will always be mud as the gravel sinks into the ground.

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Another urban myth. If the tank is at the proper depth, there's no reason to worry about driving over it. The only concern would be accessing the cleanout plug.
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"Pat" < snipped-for-privacy@artisticphotography.us> wrote in message
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Steve Barker wrote:

nope
there are driving rated tanks and those not so. It isn't the car you would worry about, but the concrete truck or dumpster truck or backhoe that you will inevitably have there....
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On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 20:50:38 -0700, RicodJour

It seems like he only has one car to park, and I don't know how much of the time it will be there.
I'm pretty sure I've seen grass last for years like that.

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First off you probably want to avoid plain gravel as the round stones shift all over the place and cause mischief. Look for a product called "road base". That is a mixture of crushed rock and sand with a little clay mixed in to get it to stick together. Several inches of this kind of material should do the trick.
You also might consider concrete pavers, not as cheap as a dump truck full of rocks but a little more aesthetically pleasing to some.
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Vadim wrote:

To do it right means removing 4-6" of soil and compacting gravel in that place.
Personally, unless it would be long term parking, I would suggest using those concrete things that allow the grass to grow up between them. The link is to some plastic version. http://www.grassypavers.com /
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wrote:

Hey Joe. I just posted about that particular manufacturer's ridiculous claims. Purportedly the plastic grid can support 97,000 PSF.
I don't support manufactorial (yes, I just made that up) fraud. There are plenty of other manufacturers of both concrete and plastic permeable pavers - it's not necessary to reward the wicked.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Yea, I was not attempting to endorse the product, I just found it and thought it looked interesting. I did not even read any of the claims. I think I would stick to the concrete versions myself.
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wrote:

That's what I prefer . On a recent project the landscaper who was doing the installation, having never seen the stuff before, was having conniptions about how "difficult" the stuff is to work with. Say what? It's a big brick, ya idjit! That was the first indication that the guy was a maroon - it went downhill from there. ;)
R
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Some type of border will help contain the gravel, no foundation needed. Use a bow rake to spread out the gravel--a string with level will help get it even. Expect to replenish the gravel over time if you don't use a border.
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