Grass / Weeds growing between patio blocks

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Last summer I put in a small patio, using 16" pre-cast blocks. I put sand under the blocks, and it's remained pretty level. But due to it's location, I have had muddy water run across it after heavy rain. I'm presently working on installing some drainage pipes for rain water.
But the reason for posting this is because there is grass and weeds growing between the blocks, and before I got down on my knees and starting pulling them, it was starting to look like a lawn, not a patio. I'm guessing the mud added some soil to the cracks, which stimulated growth of vegetation.
Is there some chemical made to stop this?
I did try pouring some gasoline in the cracks, because I had some gas that got water in it, but that was just a quart or so. I have not noticed any new growth in those cracks (with the gas), but thats probably not the safest method, and I doubt it will last long.
Any tips????
Thanks
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On Thursday, August 6, 2015 at 6:37:34 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

i use gasoline to kill grass and weeds growing in cracks in my front sidewalk. mostly because when it snows in the winter the weeds make shoeviling difficult.
it lasts a long time. i have done this for my entire life
you can use round up. its perhaps better for the environmet, and will certinally also kill the vegation
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spoken like a true liberal
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On Thu, 06 Aug 2015 05:34:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote in

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Roundup-1-33-gal-Ready-to-Use-Weed-and-Grass-Killer-Plus-Comfort-Wand-5200210/203687082
Works great.
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On 8/6/2015 7:31 AM, CRNG wrote:

Wife found one of these a couple of weeks ago when putting shopping cart in remote container and there it sat in an another supposedly empty cart. Wondered what it cost.
I've been using it on weeds growing in cracks and areas where nothing is to grow. Takes a few days to see results but as you say, works great.
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On Thursday, August 6, 2015 at 7:31:42 AM UTC-4, CRNG wrote:

Roundup works to kill what's there, but won't prevent more from immediately starting to germinate. Also, if you use more than a minimal amount of Roundup, you can buy the generic glyphosate chemical from online sources for ~$75 for 2.5 gallons of 48% concentrate. That's enough to make 250 gallons, it works out to 30 cents a gallon, compared to $10 to $20 for a gallon of readymade at HD.
The other choice is one of the extended duration products that not only kills the weeds, but keeps new ones from germinating for most of the season.
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On 8/6/15 7:31 AM, CRNG wrote:

More than once, a neighbor bought that stuff for me to apply along her fences and driveway cracks. I was always glad when I ran out because I found it a hassle.
Enough store-brand glyphosate to make 20 gallons costs less than the above item. I mix it in a 1-gallon Chapin 20000. The sprayers HD sells may be similar; some may even be the same thing under different labels.
To measure, I use a sort of plastic test tube with a scoop on the end, sold in a healthcare aisle for measuring medicine. It's marked in ml. I just have to remember, 15ml = 1 tablespoon, 30ml = 1 ounce.
I'll often mix just a quart. The sprayer will spray down to the last ounce. The wand extends 15" beyond my hand, which makes it easier to apply precisely if I'm walking along treating hundreds of feet. The pattern is infinitely adjustable from a broad mist to a stream. For real precision, it can spray at a low pressure, where the herbicide trickles out.
I won't mix a batch for weeds in cracks, but it's easy to get them on the way by when I mix a quart for other problems.
It takes several days to see results from glyphosate. HD has some Spectracide concentrate that works in hours.
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On 8/6/2015 5:34 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

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Is there some reason why you cannot get down on yer knees and pull the weeds?
IMO, there are waaaaay too many ppl shortcutting to toxic chemicals to solve their problems in an easy fashion. Kills me that ppl berate big-ag for using too many chemicals, then uses the same toxins at home.
BTW, I have the same problem. Plus, I'm an ancient geezer who deplores weeding. Buy some knee pads and gloves and get some exercise. ;)
nb
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On Thursday, August 6, 2015 at 10:04:14 AM UTC-4, notbob wrote:

Pulling them disturbs the dirt that's there, which just makes it easier for more weeds to grow. Also, many times with pulling, you just break off the top of the weed, the rest stays and continues to grow.

Apparently you don't deplore it as much as you do using a chemical that's safe, widely used and very effective if used properly. I just used glyphosate on my patio, beds, etc.
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"Safe"? Now there's a term I've never heard applied to glyphosate.
Is that "safe" as in Agent Orange "safe" or PCB "safe" or DDT "safe"?
nb
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On Thursday, August 6, 2015 at 12:14:52 PM UTC-4, notbob wrote:

Of course you haven't because you only look at one side and have your mind made up regardless of the facts.
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I notice you did not address the other part of my post. What is an indisputable "fact", is, Monsanto has been lying to, --let's not forget poisoning!-- us, for decades.
nb
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Uh, it's "you can drink it" safe.
Never heard the term applied to glycophosphate? You don't get around much.
--
Dan Espen

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You are quoting who? Monsanto?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovKw6YjqSfM


I get around enough to know when I'm being lied to.
nb
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No. Monsanto had nothing to do with establishing the Lethal Dose. That's done by guys wearing lab coats at the EPA:
Laboratory Testing: Before pesticides are registered by the U.S. EPA, they must undergo laboratory testing for short-term (acute) and long-term (chronic) health effects. Laboratory animals are purposely given high enough doses to cause toxic effects. These tests help scientists judge how these chemicals might affect humans, domestic animals, and wildlife in cases of overexposure.
Try something with some information in it instead of "theater".
http://tinyurl.com/oqds7kr

Why would I lie? I could be mistaken, but I have no motive to lie.
--
Dan Espen

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On 08/06/2015 10:00 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

The e-pee-a is a wholly-owned subsidiary of mon-scam-toe.
If you think there is anyone in the government protecting you from the toxic sludge bigPharma or bigChem makes, I got a bridge to sell you.
Now run along and take the statins that your allopathic drug pusher prescribed...if you can still remember where you put them.
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You're sentiments reflect the sad state of our society.
People find a ridiculous bit of theater on youtube more convincing than a fact sheet full of numbers based on laboratory studies.
Oh well.
Good luck with your homeopathy, I'm going to stick with conventional medicine. Silly me.
--
Dan Espen

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On Friday, August 7, 2015 at 10:08:06 AM UTC-4, net cop wrote:

+1
Also, we're talking about using some Roundup to spray cracks in a patio, which is very minimal usage. If you're worried about that, better through out all the chemical cleaners, detergents, and other common products found in your house.
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On 8/7/2015 9:08 AM, Dan Espen wrote:

I've read that the chemicals in Roundup can not only cause cancer, but also liver and kidney problems.
http://www.gmoevidence.com/criigen-gm-maize-and-roundup-can-cause-tumours-multiple-organ-damage-and-premature-death/
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