granite countertops- and oil based paint

A friend had their kitchen cabinets painted/sprayed with an oilbased paint. Some of the paint got sprayed onto the granite countertops...it feels rough in some areas.. what is the best way to remove this and get it back to the smooth shine? are they ruined? I think the granite was sealed prior thanks
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Granite cutters have polishing tools and abrasives. Their installer could make quick work of the imperfections. Considering the usual installed prices of granite of $50 a square foot and up, spending $200 or so on restoration is not unreasonable. Memo: this wouldn't be a problem with Formica.
Joe
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On 5/12/2008 7:53 PM Joe spake thus:

"Polishing tools and abrasives"? Why on earth would you even mention that? If there's paint on the granite, a little paint remover will take it off with no problem. Use Citri-Strip or one of the other eco-friendly ones, not the nasty methyl chloride stuff. Me, I'd probably just put a few drops of brake fluid over the paint specks and let it sit until softened. But you certainly don't need to be grinding on the granite.
Try a small area first to make sure it doesn't discolor the granite. I doubt it will. (Worst case, you may need to strip the sealer from the granite and have it re-sealed.)
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wrote:

Granite cutters have polishing tools and abrasives. Their installer could make quick work of the imperfections. Considering the usual installed prices of granite of $50 a square foot and up, spending $200 or so on restoration is not unreasonable. Memo: this wouldn't be a problem with Formica.
Joe
There's a lot of deferent textures to granite, Some is pours., some is like a piece of glass. I would try a razor blade but would recommend using soapy water as a lubricant. after mine was installed they put a scratch in ( very small) they hit it with a peanut grinder with a Diamond abrasive pad. It's a little duller were they buffed it out , you would never see it if you didn't know were it was. If the overspray is imbedded in the granite ( pours ) you might want to consult a professional. As for you comment about Formica. Any paint would rub right off with a rag and lacquer thinner, That's how the clean the contact cement off when the make the counter tops.
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KOS wrote:

A nylon scrubber, like used in the shower, might work. A new razor blade probably best, with caution. I know it would take the paint off easily, as I have used them on glass but never on granite.
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On 5/12/2008 8:35 PM Norminn spake thus:

Instead of a razor blade, how about a sharp plastic scraper, like an auto window scraper? Less likely to scratch the polished surface.
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