Gorilla Glue

Does anyone have any experience with Gorilla glue? I'm repair an antique and need to glue some blocks on the bottom of it for the casters. I only want to use glue because that's what was used originally and I want to keep it as original as possible. Just wondering if the glue will hold or is there a better alternative.
Thanks,
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JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

Yes and it (like all of the polyurethanes) sucks for the purpose...
I foams and while it will certainly hold (although tests in FWW and elsewhere show that it isn't as strong as good ol' yellow glue) the only reason to use it would be for a location that needs the waterproof characteristic...
It certainly doesn't fit on keeping an antique "as original as possible".
Depending on how antique an antique this is and whether it was machine- or hand-manufactured, the likely candidates would be hide glue or one of the early manufactured glues if factory-produced.
For repair and conservation work, folks tend to use the hide glues as they can be removed if necessary for further restoration or repair in the future.
If you're really concerned to that level of detail, that would be my recommendation. If you're seriously thinking of using Gorilla glue, though, that doesn't sound like the case so just get some yellow carpenters glue and use that. Make the area to be glued clean and dry and a glue block can be fitted simply by rubbing it in place until the glue "sticks" and it will hold w/ a bond as strong as the wood or stronger if clean and surfaces fit smoothly.
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JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

My experience has been that the Gorilla Glue is stronger than any wood to which I have applied it. Its strong stuff. The moisture ressance after cure is helpful.
I've had equally good experience with aliphatic resin glues and I suspect Gorilla Glue is just a variation on one of these.
Even Elmer's carpenters glue is equally strong if moisture after cure is not an ssue, and if the possble unsightly glue puddles with the Elmers are not an concern. Careful working habits will avoid most of those problems, which can also occur with the Gorilla Glue, too, if you are sloppy.
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jJim McLaughlin wrote:

Gorilla glue is a polyurethane...
Somewhat surprisingly, in the glue test FWW did a couple of months ago, the polyurethane came in at an average strength of 58% of that of the Type I pva which was the strongest. That said, most of the joint failures tested with all glues were either wood or wood/glue combined failures with only a small fraction of the loose-fitting joints being 100% glue failure. But, of those which were, the polyurethane was the largest number.
Cleanup of the water soluble glues is much simpler than the polyurethanes which need acetone or another solvent and the foaming characteristic is a major detriment to their use in my book for anything not absolutely requiring the waterproof (as opposed to water resistant) characteristic.
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Actually, once the "poly u" glues set, the only way to remove the stuff is by mechanical means (scraping, sanding). If you don't use the acetone within a few minutes of getting it on your fingers it will have to be peeled off.

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John Gilmer wrote:

Well, yes, once pva glue sets it takes more than just a wet cloth to clean up squeeze out. So???
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I use it, but find if you don't clamp the heck out of the work it tends to expand as it hardens.

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On Sep 15, 10:38 am, "JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com"

Not that it relates to your intended usage, but here's my experience with it. I used it on several items made from pressure treated wood, said items sat outside on the ground. All the glued joints came apart within a year. Don't know if the problem was the glue, the PT wood, or the ground contact, but it sure didn't work like I expected.
Red
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wrote:

PT wood does not absorb glue like untreated wood.
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Jim Yanik
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It sure does a good job of absorbing water. And since you moisten the surfaces prior to applying gorilla glue, I thought the glue would follow the moisture into the wood grain. Apparently not.
Red
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Red wrote:

Hard to say w/ no more information as to how the joints were constructed, loadings, etc., but my guess would be that unless the mating surfaces were prepared to expose fresh wood and unless the material was either kiln-dried initially or allowed to dry before assembly the treatment would be the prime culprit. However, the actual strength of the polyurethane glue in the FWW test was, as noted, quite a bit less than for any of the others in their physical strength tests and most particularly where the joints were made specifically to be somewhat loose to test the "gap-filling" ability. In that case, rather than having only about 60% on average of the strength of the top-rated PVA, it was only about 25-30% in a direct comparison of similar joint construction and woods.
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message

To get a good joint, both surfaces have to be flat and smooth. And it would be nice to be able to clamp them after application. I am guessing that the bottom of your legs are not flat, and you probably can't clamp either. On the other hand, this sounds like a pretty low stress situation, so a great joint isn't necessary.
Gorilla glue will fill gaps and does not need to be clamped. However it will not be very strong under those circumstances. But, it might well work for your purpose. Unfortunately it also foams out the side of the joint, and the foam is hard to get off without sanding. That might make it inappropriate.
I would use epoxy. It fills gaps, doesn't need to be clamped, and doesn't foam. It is expensive.
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On Sat, 15 Sep 2007 08:38:55 -0700,

You didnt mention if the place you're gluing the blocks to had been previously finished. Neither gorilla glue nor yellow glue will stick well to a finished surface. They both need a clean, raw, wood to wood contact to work well. If thats what you have, I'd use yellow glue before I'd consider gorilla glue.
-dickm
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JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

It is a curious sounding item.....a table? How old? If it is a very old piece, it might have been glued with some form of hide glue. Wood glue would be my choice without knowing more. I can't imagine an antique, even though not bearing much weight, having casters that fit into a piece held only with glue. Sure it's not an add-on?
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On Sep 15, 11:38 am, "JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com"

The glue will hold . Sand the bottom and wet the surfaces (damp) before using the glue. It must be clamped as the glue will foam. Once hard. cut and sand the foam off and stain /fimish the area.
The glue is very agressive but is a excellemt product. Other products will work as well. You did not indicate the type of antique you are gluing to and how it will be used with teh casters.
snipped-for-privacy@marwall.com
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JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

As others point out, it is a polyurethane which foams on curing. In my experience, polyurethanes do not have the stability of older glues and degrade over time. I personally would not use it on an item that I would want to keep around for a long time.
Crosslinked, or cured resins are not soluble in solvents but may be plasticized, or absorb enough solvent to soften and be able to be physically removed.
Frank
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