Google is not the only one who knows all about you.

Page 1 of 2  
Interesting experience.
All I wanted to do was get the phone number of the place I get my blood tests, so I could call them today and find out how much a couple special order tests cost if I have to pay for them myself. (My doctor and I are not seeing eye-to-eye on everything lately.)
And it suggests I sign in, and I can pay my bill and make appointments, the standard stuff. But it seems to say I can also read the test results, which might mean I can read them for tests I had a while ago, results which didn't matter when I got them but might matter retroactively now. They probably do a better job of keeping records.
So I signed up, all the while thinking, How is it going to decide it's me. Won't I have to go to the office and show my driver's license. After all this has the normal concern for privacy plus the HIPAA folks.
Soon after I found out how. It wanted the last 4 digits of my SSN. I don't remember ever telling the lab this number, but it's part of my Medicare number. (Identity theft coming your way!)
Then it asked what color my car is. I know I never told them what kind of car I have but they knew the year, make and model. They gave 5 choices and my color was one of them.
Then they wanted to know which of 5 choices I ever worked at, and they had a place I worked at 20 years ago.
Then they wanted to know which city out of 5 I went to college, 45 years ago, and they included the right city.
On the next page they wanted to know about another car I ever owned or leased, and gave 5 choices. 1988 Chrysler Lebaron was one of them but what's really amazing is that they called it a 1988 Chrysler Lebaron Highline. I thought it was a trick. I owned the car for 7 years and never heard it called a Highline. I never heard or read the word at all. I think I had the owners manual too, and I'm sure I have the shop manual. (It's in the basement.) But I googled, and that's what it seems to be called! Wikip says Highline - 1985–1989
Then they gave 5 choices of when I bought my house and one of them was right, including the month, even though it was 32 years ago.
I didn't tell them any of these things. In the middle of the night they knew. Scary, huh?
Google is not the only one who knows all about you.
(Every question also had a none-of-the-above style choice)
Anyhow, it accepted me and let me file a request for a test result. I think it was 6 days ago and they want 7 days
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It said something like: Date requested. Must be within 60 days
And I thought that meant if I had a test within 60 days of the date, they'd find it. But it seems to mean I can only go back 60 days.
For 10 more dollars, I can go back to 2010. But what I need now is a list of dates I had tests. If I have to tell them the date, spending 10 dollars won't get me anything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Micky,
Won't these test results be in your medical record? Look there.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/22/2015 6:18 AM, Micky wrote:

Are you dealing with the lab? Perhaps your doctor or medical group has that information available at no cost. With "My Chart" that our medical group uses we can go back a number of years. I can even to it from my phone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/22/2015 06:32 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

My provider just went with that so there is no history. However, I stopped in for a lipid panel in the morning and when I got home I had email saying the results were up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's a good idea. I read the group's webpage and I don't think it mentioned it. But the $10 is a one-time fee and it would be worth it to have both current doctors' lab tests and maybe others in the future. However it turned out late yesterday that it's not available in Maryland. All my blood etc. tests were normal until 9 days ago (except the parathyroid, which is normal again after the simple surgery.) but this time a lipid was marginal, I think he said.

This lab has the phone thing too, but they wanted more than 10 dollars for the phone! ;-)

Turns out in Md. the law prevents them from sending the results until I ask for them. Since automatic sending is part of the $10 fee, maybe that's why I can't get advanced at all, so I'm going to try to get them to make automatic sending unavailable in Maryland. Of course that's so obvious they would have though of that, so maybe there's another reason.
But for free with what I signed up for yesterday I can get anything 2 days after the doctor does, and I can save it on my computer one test at a time, but won't have it nicely packaged like they said they would do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, December 22, 2015 at 6:05:10 AM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

I've experienced the same type of security questionnaire. If memory serves me correctly, the FASFA website uses those types of questions when you forget your password.
I agree that it can be a bit unnerving. You never specifically submitted those answers like you do at other websites where you build your own questionnaire by using the drop-down menu to pick a question (e.g. "What is the first name of your Best Man?")
I don't know if the website you used was government related in any way (you mentioned Medicare) but the FASFA website is, so perhaps that's the connection.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/22/2015 07:18 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I did one of those recently and it was a pain in the butt. Where were you born? Wrong! it has to be at least six characters. What street did you live on? Wrong! It has to be at least six characters. There were a couple more like that.
Some time ago when sites first started with that I registered and promptly forgot my password. I think it was AT&T. Okay, do the I forgot my password thing.
"What is the answer to your secret question?" Oh, come on, at least give me a clue to what the frigging secret question was. I can't remember the password and I'm supposed to remember which stupid secret question I picked?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Early on I decided not to use my full name on the net unless I was spending money and I had to pay (or online banking or medicine), so when I signed up for yahoo email, I lied about my birthday. Then I forgot my password and couldn't remember the phony birthday either.
I was stuck and had to make another yahoo account. I guess this was 20 years ago. Every few years I write to my old address to see if it bounces. And if it does I try to sign up for it again because I liked the name better. IIRC it bounced but I still coudn't sign up for that address. I just wrote my old address again.
Now I take the email they send me saying I'm enrolled in something and I copy in the userid and password and maybe other stuff, and I store all of them in a mailbox, in alphabetical order. Before I go out of town I copy the mailbox to my laptop OR I go through and copy to paper the small number I really need. I also take snapshorts of the password pages of Firefox settings and insert them in the mailbox.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Dec 2015 06:18:56 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

No, it's a private medical laboratory that does blood tests (and urine tests I'm sure) for doctors.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| I didn't tell them any of these things. In the middle of the night | they knew. Scary, huh? | | Google is not the only one who knows all about you. |
Google knows what you're doing. I think the tests you describe are using services like LexisNexis. That is, companies pay for access to databases where they can look things up. (Ever notice how people search pages often have an option to pay for more info?) Those databases are owned by companies that just collect and resell data of all kinds.
I remember reading, some years ago, that when one calls a car dealer they know how to sell to you before a salesman gets on the phone: income, car buying history, etc.
So the test you saw was from a combination of sources, probably mostly public records.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Dec 2015 09:29:30 -0500, "Mayayana"

Yes, and I did that once. The one that was offerred was cheap, but it gave very little information. The bulk of it was sex offender information and not that the guy was a sex offender, which would have been very important, but he probably wasn't, but all the sex offenders who lived in his zip code. This was to be a business arrangement with someone who lived in another city. Other than my distaste for sex offenders, I don't care how many live in his zipcode. But it made the report look big when it was thin.
I had hoped it would include criminal information, like whether he'd been convicted of fraud -- I can't remember why I thought it would -- but it didnt' and it might not have even checked.

Hmmm.
I was reading that Ted Cruz has his door-to-door campaign workers in Iowa outfitted with tablets, and they know all kinds of background about the people in the homes that walk up to, traditional, non-traditional, anti-traditional, etc. etc. and they're coached on a different pitch for each kind of person. If they did that to me, I would find that two-faced, or 8-faced.

I only have one facebook page, so I can be friends with my niece, and it has no information on it, not even my real name.
I don't think where i worked is supposed to be public. It's not a secret, but it shoudln't be in any records except the employer's and the IRS's.
ONly the DMV and the sellers know what cars I've owned. In the case of one of the cars mentioned, the seller was an out of state dealer and for the other, the seller was a private party That leaves the DMV. Can you go to your DMV and give them someone's name and address and find out what car they own now and owned 11 years ago? I dont' think so. So if you can't do it, why can they?
Where I went to college is also not a secret, but I've only told grad schools and prospective employers who are supposed to keep their student/personnel records confidential. When hackers break into corporate records, do they steal the college background of employees, to sell it to medical labs who want to verify who I am? Seems unlikey.
OTOH, when I bought my house is definitely public. I've looked up a couple of my neighbors and can see when they bought their houses and how much they paid, as they can with me. (In NYS it's often recorded as $1 and other valuable consideration, but not here I guess.) I looked up the President-For-Life of my HOA, a lying, cheating, stealing, obnoxious woman, and found that she'd bought her own house and a house for her son (That's fine. He probably had no credit) and she claimed both times that she'd never collected the Homestead Credit that Maryland allows in many or all situations, but only once. So she perjured herself on the form and illegally collected the credit a second time. (An image of the entire form is online, not just the information in it.) These things were always public, but you had to go to the county seat, to the county clerk's office, during business hours, and work your way through the files. Now you can read this stuff at home 24/7.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| I only have one facebook page, so I can be friends with my niece, and | it has no information on it, not even my real name. |
You shouldn't talk about that. Mark Zuckerberg and his sidekicks are trying to crack down on pseudonym pages. They don't want you to have privacy. They want to optimize what they can charge for ads on your page, and for that they need to know all about you and your friends. If they figure out you're using a pseudonym they'll close your page. (There was an interesting story awhile back about people who lost their Facebook pages because they had odd names that sounded like they might be fake.)
Some time ago I came across a truly chilling quote from Cheryl Sandberg, the Facebook "COO". It's interesting in that it shows just how far these people have strayed from basic honesty and integrity... apparently without even realizing it. She said that Facebook "enables brands to find their voices. and to have genuine, personal relationships with their customers" ... "to make marketing truly social".
She's calling advertisers and their clients your friends! That's what Zuck is talking about when he says he wants to connect the whole world. It's reminiscent of the old Twilight Zone episode (or was it Outer Limits?) about the nice aliens who land and demonstrate their good intentions with a book called "How to Serve Humans". A scientist figures out, only after it's too late, that it's a cookbook. :)
| Can you go to your DMV and give them someone's name and | address and find out what car they own now and owned 11 years ago? I | dont' think so. So if you can't do it, why can they? | I don't know. I suspect there's a difference between an individual, with unknown intentions, and a private investigator, bank, or insurance company when it comes to getting such info.
But the real change is computerization. The info is all in databases where it used to be on paper, in file cabinets. Digitization means nearly all data is easy to access, analyze and cross reference. That's a profound change. Your car insurance company knows your car model and driving record. There's no reason to assume they haven't sold that data. The DMV (Registry of Motor Vehicles in my neck of the woods) may also make their records available to dataminers. I wouldn't be at all surprised to learn that those records are being sold. ("Hey, do you wanna sell data or do you want higher taxes?") CVS now sells your personal medical info to drug companies for marketing purposes, if you buy any drugs from CVS. Your doctor can't legally do that, but there's no law about CVS selling their business records. Privacy regulations, which were never important before computers, simply haven't caught up. And they may not, given the power of lobbyists. Selling data and targetting ads is already a massive industry. If you think of CVS and imagine how many similar cases there may be, there's a good chance that companies like LexisNexis know more about you than you do... far more. Their memory is perfect.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/23/15 9:47 AM, Mayayana wrote:

just like CVS. But just like CVS, they'd have to get your permission. Unlike CVS, they don't have this frequent shopper card that nobody ever reads the fine print.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| > CVS now sells your personal medical info to drug companies | > for marketing purposes, if you buy any drugs from CVS. Your | > doctor can't legally do that, but there's no law about CVS | > selling their business records. Privacy regulations, which were | > never important before computers, simply haven't caught | > up. And they may not, given the power of lobbyists. Selling | > data and targetting ads is already a massive industry. If | > you think of CVS and imagine how many similar cases there | > may be, there's a good chance that companies like | > LexisNexis know more about you than you do... far more. | > Their memory is perfect. | > | > | Actually your doctor could sell every bit of medical they want to, | just like CVS. But just like CVS, they'd have to get your permission. | Unlike CVS, they don't have this frequent shopper card that nobody ever | reads the fine print.
Loyalty cards are a separate issue. There are various wrinkles in this. CVS was sued for marketing directly to doctors:
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2011-03-09/cvs-accused-in-suit-of-using-customers-pharmacy-data-for-drug-companies
There have been issues with selling data directly to drug makers. Maybe it's anonymized and then de-anonymized. Maybe it isn't. In any case, there's no permission involved:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/09/business/09privacy.html?_r=0
There's also an issue with medical data sold by gov't agencies, which then sell it to data miners:
http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/articles/2013-08-08/your-medical-records-are-for-sale
In other words, there are various ways around permission requirements, if they even exist.
It's unclear to me in all this what the exact law is related to doctors, CVS and permission. My understanding was that a doctor cannot sell data, but a non-medical business can. I may be wrong. If you know otherwise, or more, I'd be interested to see the links that explain it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/23/15 11:22 AM, Mayayana wrote:

Accountability Act. (The best resource is https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/HIPAA-Administrative-Simplification/HIPAAGenInfo/index.html0 and he Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH Act) https://www.healthit.gov/policy-researchers-implementers/health-it-legislation
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| > It's unclear to me in all this what the exact law | > is related to doctors, CVS and permission. My | > understanding was that a doctor cannot sell data, | > but a non-medical business can. I may be wrong. | > If you know otherwise, or more, I'd be interested | > to see the links that explain it. | > | > | The two major (federal) ones is the Health Isurance Portability and | Accountability Act. (The best resource is | https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/HIPAA-Administrative-Simplification/HIPAAGenInfo/index.html0 | and he Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health | Act (HITECH Act) | https://www.healthit.gov/policy-researchers-implementers/health-it-legislation |
Those links seem to be for vast plans to regulate health plan medical records and digitization standards. I was talking about specific information about specific laws, or lack thereof, governing the sale of medical data. I thought I had read in one of the CVS articles that doctors could not legally share data, but that other businesses could get around that. As one can see from my links, they are getting around it one way or another. What's not clear from my links is whether they can just sell the data directly in a legal way, without getting permission.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/23/15 12:27 PM, Mayayana wrote:

at the federal level. At least under HIPAA (I havent worked as much with HITECH, although that would talk about data transmission from electronic health records. The holy grail is Personal Health Information (PHI).
http://www.hipaa.com/hipaa-protected-health-information-what-does-phi-include/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/23/2015 8:47 AM, Mayayana wrote:

It was the Twilight Zone, and the title was "To Serve Man".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Dec 2015 06:04:59 -0500

All is in your credit history and more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.